Duke at his Very Best - The Jimmy Blanton, Billy Strayhorn, Ben Webster Sessions
Duke at his Very Best - The Jimmy Blanton, Billy Strayhorn, Ben Webster Sessions
Ref.: FA5869

Legendary Works 1940-1942

Ref.: FA5869

Artistic Direction : Alain Pailler et Tony Baldwin

Label :  FREMEAUX & ASSOCIES

Total duration of the pack : 4 hours 51 minutes

Nbre. CD : 4

Select a version :
Thanks to this pack, you get a 17.50 % discount or €13.99
This product is already in your shopping cart
A digital version of this product is already in your shopping cart
Shipped within 24 to 48 hours.
Distinctions
Recommended by :
  • - Recommandé par France Culture
  • - Recommandé par France Musique
  • - Choc Classica
Presentation

This 4-CD set was produced by Alain Pailler and Tony Baldwin from meticulously restored originals that let you relive the Duke Ellington Orchestra’s golden age as though you were right there. These legendary 1940-1942 sessions include Ellington classics such as Ko-Ko, Take The ‘A’ Train, Perdido and Harlem Air-Shaft, masterfully arranged by the Duke himself and his right-hand man Billy Strayhorn. The set prominently features several Swing Era giants at their very peak: Cootie Williams and Ray Nance on trumpets; cornettist Rex Stewart; trombone players Joe Nanton and Lawrence Brown; Barney Bigard on clarinet; Johnny Hodges, Ben Webster and Harry Carney on saxophones, plus the brilliant young doublebass prodigy Jimmy Blanton. It’s a milestone in jazz history and makes essential listening.
Patrick Frémeaux



CD1 : JACK THE BEAR • KO-KO • MORNING GLORY • CONGA BRAVA • CONCERTO FOR COOTIE • COTTON TAIL • NEVER NO LAMENT • DUSK • BOJANGLES (A PORTRAIT OF BILL ROBINSON) • A PORTRAIT OF BERT WILLIAMS • BLUE GOOSE • HARLEM AIR-SHAFT • ALL TOO SOON • RUMPUS IN RICHMOND • SEPIA PANORAMA • IN A MELLOTONE • WARM VALLEY • ACROSS THE TRACK BLUES • CHLOË (SONG OF THE SWAMP) • THE SIDEWALKS OF NEW YORK • TAKE THE ‘A’ TRAIN • BLUE SERGE • JUMPIN’ PUNKINS.

CD2 : JOHN HARDY’S WIFE • AFTER ALL • ARE YOU STICKING? • JUST A-SETTIN’ AND A-ROCKIN’ • THE GIDDYBUG GALLOP • CHOCOLATE SHAKE • I GOT IT BAD (AND THAT AIN’T GOOD) • CLEMENTINE • JUMP FOR JOY • FIVE O’CLOCK DRAG • ROCKS IN MY BED • BLI-BLIP • CHELSEA BRIDGE • RAINCHECK • I DON’T KNOW WHAT KIND OF BLUES I GOT • PERDIDO • C JAM BLUES • MOON MIST • WHAT AM I HERE FOR? • I DON’T MIND • SOMEONE • MAIN STEM • JOHNNY COME LATELY • SENTIMENTAL LADY.

CD 3 : YOU, YOU DARLIN’ • SO FAR, SO GOOD • ME AND YOU • AT A DIXIE ROADSIDE DINER • MY GREATEST MISTAKE • THERE SHALL BE NO NIGHT • FIVE O’CLOCK WHISTLE • THE FLAMING SWORD • I NEVER FELT THIS WAY BEFORE • FLAMINGO • THE GIRL IN MY DREAMS (TRIES TO LOOK LIKE YOU) • BAKIFF • THE BROWN-SKIN GAL (IN THE CALICO GOWN) • MOON OVER CUBA • WHAT GOOD WOULD IT DO? • MY LITTLE BROWN BOOK • HAYFOOT STRAWFOOT • A SLIP OF THE LIP (CAN SINK A SHIP) • SHERMAN SHUFFLE • PITTER PANTHER PATTER • BODY AND SOUL • SOPHISTICATED LADY • MR. J.B. BLUES.

CD4 : GOOD QUEEN BESS • DAY DREAM • THAT’S THE BLUES, OLD MAN • JUNIOR HOP • WITHOUT A SONG • MY SUNDAY GAL • MOBILE BAY • LINGER AWHILE • CHARLIE THE CHULO • LAMENT FOR JAVANETTE • A LULL AT DAWN • READY EDDY • SOME SATURDAY • SUBTLE SLOUGH • MENELIK (THE LION OF JUDAH) • POOR BUBBER • SQUATY ROO • PASSION FLOWER • THINGS AIN’T WHAT THEY USED TO BE • GOIN’ OUT THE BACK WAY • BROWN SUEDE • NOIR BLEU • ‘C’ BLUES • JUNE.

DIRECTION ARTISTIQUE : ALAIN PAILLER, TONY BALDWIN

Tracklist
  • Piste
    Title
    Main artist
    Autor
    Duration
    Registered in
  • 1
    Jack The Bear
    Duke Ellington
    Duke Ellington
    00:03:16
    1940
  • 2
    Ko-Ko
    Duke Ellington
    Duke Ellington
    00:02:41
    1940
  • 3
    Morning Glory
    Duke Ellington
    Duke Ellington
    00:03:16
    1940
  • 4
    Conga Brava
    Duke Ellington
    Duke Ellington
    00:02:57
    1940
  • 5
    Concerto For Cootie
    Duke Ellington
    Duke Ellington
    00:03:19
    1940
  • 6
    Cotton Tail
    Duke Ellington
    Duke Ellington
    00:03:10
    1940
  • 7
    Never No Lament
    Duke Ellington
    Duke Ellington
    00:03:18
    1940
  • 8
    Dusk
    Duke Ellington
    Duke Ellington
    00:03:17
    1940
  • 9
    Bojangles (A Portrait Of Bill Robinson)
    Duke Ellington
    Duke Ellington
    00:02:52
    1940
  • 10
    A Portrait Of Bert Williams
    Duke Ellington
    Duke Ellington
    00:03:09
    1940
  • 11
    Blue Goose
    Duke Ellington
    Duke Ellington
    00:03:21
    1940
  • 12
    Harlem Air-Shaft
    Duke Ellington
    Duke Ellington
    00:02:58
    1940
  • 13
    All Too Soon
    Duke Ellington
    Duke Ellington
    00:03:30
    1940
  • 14
    Rumpus In Richmond
    Duke Ellington
    Duke Ellington
    00:02:46
    1940
  • 15
    Sepia Panorama
    Duke Ellington
    Duke Ellington
    00:03:22
    1940
  • 16
    In A Mellotone
    Duke Ellington
    Duke Ellington
    00:03:17
    1940
  • 17
    Warm Valley
    Duke Ellington
    Duke Ellington
    00:03:22
    1940
  • 18
    Across The Track Blues
    Duke Ellington
    Duke Ellington
    00:02:59
    1940
  • 19
    Chloë (Song Of The Swamp)
    Duke Ellington
    Gus Kahn
    00:03:25
    1940
  • 20
    The Sidewalks Of New York
    Duke Ellington
    James W. Blake
    00:03:15
    1940
  • 21
    Take The ‘A’ Train
    Duke Ellington
    Billy Strayhorn
    00:02:55
    1941
  • 22
    Blue Serge
    Duke Ellington
    Duke Ellington
    00:03:21
    1941
  • 23
    Jumpin’ Punkins
    Duke Ellington
    Mercer Ellington
    00:03:33
    1941
  • Piste
    Title
    Main artist
    Autor
    Duration
    Registered in
  • 1
    John Hardy’s Wife
    Duke Ellington
    Mercer Ellington
    00:03:30
    1941
  • 2
    After All
    Duke Ellington
    Billy Strayhorn
    00:03:20
    1941
  • 3
    Are You Sticking ?
    Duke Ellington
    Duke Ellington
    00:03:01
    1941
  • 4
    Just A-Settin’ and A-Rockin’
    Duke Ellington
    Duke Ellington
    00:03:34
    1941
  • 5
    The Giddybug Gallop
    Duke Ellington
    Duke Ellington
    00:03:31
    1941
  • 6
    Chocolate Shake
    Duke Ellington
    Duke Ellington
    00:02:53
    1941
  • 7
    I Got It Bad (And That Ain’t Good)
    Duke Ellington
    Duke Ellington
    00:03:18
    1941
  • 8
    Clementine
    Duke Ellington
    Billy Strayhorn
    00:02:58
    1941
  • 9
    Jump For Joy
    Duke Ellington
    Duke Ellington
    00:02:54
    1941
  • 10
    Five O’Clock Drag
    Duke Ellington
    Duke Ellington
    00:03:12
    1941
  • 11
    Rocks In My Bed
    Duke Ellington
    Duke Ellington
    00:03:05
    1941
  • 12
    Bli-Blip
    Duke Ellington
    Duke Ellington
    00:03:03
    1941
  • 13
    Chelsea Bridge
    Duke Ellington
    Billy Strayhorn
    00:02:53
    1941
  • 14
    Raincheck
    Duke Ellington
    Billy Strayhorn
    00:02:27
    1941
  • 15
    I Don’t Know What Kind Of Blues I Got
    Duke Ellington
    Duke Ellington
    00:03:14
    1941
  • 16
    Perdido
    Duke Ellington
    Juan Tizol
    00:03:09
    1942
  • 17
    C Jam Blues
    Duke Ellington
    Duke Ellington
    00:02:39
    1942
  • 18
    Moon Mist
    Duke Ellington
    Mercer Ellington
    00:02:58
    1942
  • 19
    What Am I Here For?
    Duke Ellington
    Duke Ellington
    00:03:25
    1942
  • 20
    I Don’t Mind
    Duke Ellington
    Duke Ellington
    00:02:49
    1942
  • 21
    Someone
    Duke Ellington
    Duke Ellington
    00:03:09
    1942
  • 22
    Main Stem
    Duke Ellington
    Duke Ellington
    00:02:48
    1942
  • 23
    Johnny Come Lately
    Duke Ellington
    Billy Strayhorn
    00:02:39
    1942
  • 24
    Sentimental Lady
    Duke Ellington
    Duke Ellington
    00:03:02
    1942
  • Piste
    Title
    Main artist
    Autor
    Duration
    Registered in
  • 1
    You, You Darlin’
    Duke Ellington
    Jack Scholl
    00:03:20
    1940
  • 2
    So Far, So Good
    Duke Ellington
    Jack Lawrence
    00:02:53
    1940
  • 3
    Me and You
    Duke Ellington
    Duke Ellington
    00:02:54
    1940
  • 4
    At A Dixie Roadside Diner
    Duke Ellington
    Edgar Leslie
    00:02:48
    1940
  • 5
    My Greatest Mistake
    Duke Ellington
    Jack Fulton
    00:03:25
    1940
  • 6
    There Shall Be No Night
    Duke Ellington
    Gladys Shelley
    00:03:10
    1940
  • 7
    Five O’Clock Whistle
    Duke Ellington
    Kim Gannon
    00:03:18
    1940
  • 8
    The Flaming Sword
    Duke Ellington
    Duke Ellington
    00:03:06
    1940
  • 9
    I Never Felt This Way Before
    Duke Ellington
    Duke Ellington
    00:03:29
    1940
  • 10
    Flamingo
    Duke Ellington
    Ted Grouya
    00:03:24
    1940
  • 11
    The Girl In My Dreams (Tries To Look Like You)
    Duke Ellington
    Mercer Ellington
    00:03:18
    1940
  • 12
    Bakiff
    Duke Ellington
    Juan Tizol
    00:03:23
    1941
  • 13
    The Brown-Skin Gal (In The Calico Gown)
    Duke Ellington
    Duke Ellington
    00:03:08
    1941
  • 14
    Moon Over Cuba
    Duke Ellington
    Duke Ellington
    00:03:10
    1941
  • 15
    What Good Would It Do?
    Duke Ellington
    Pepper
    00:02:45
    1941
  • 16
    My Little Brown Book
    Duke Ellington
    Billy Strayhorn
    00:03:12
    1942
  • 17
    Hayfoot Strawfoot
    Duke Ellington
    Harry Lenk
    00:02:33
    1942
  • 18
    A Slip Of The Lip (Can Sink A Ship)
    Duke Ellington
    Mercer Ellington
    00:02:53
    1942
  • 19
    Sherman Shuffle
    Duke Ellington
    Duke Ellington
    00:02:38
    1942
  • 20
    Pitter Panther Patter
    Duke Ellington
    Duke Ellington
    00:03:02
    1940
  • 21
    Body And Soul
    Duke Ellington
    Edward Heyman
    00:03:10
    1940
  • 22
    Sophisticated Lady
    Duke Ellington
    Mitchell Parish
    00:02:44
    1940
  • 23
    Mr. J.B. Blues
    Duke Ellington
    Duke Ellington
    00:03:05
    1940
  • Piste
    Title
    Main artist
    Autor
    Duration
    Registered in
  • 1
    Good Queen Bess
    Duke Ellington
    Johnny Hodges
    00:03:00
    1940
  • 2
    Day Dream
    Duke Ellington
    La Touche
    00:02:55
    1940
  • 3
    That’s The Blues, Old Man
    Duke Ellington
    Johnny Hodges
    00:02:55
    1940
  • 4
    Junior Hop
    Duke Ellington
    Duke Ellington
    00:03:07
    1940
  • 5
    Without A Song
    Duke Ellington
    Billy Rose
    00:02:45
    1940
  • 6
    My Sunday Gal
    Duke Ellington
    Duke Ellington
    00:03:09
    1940
  • 7
    Mobile Bay
    Duke Ellington
    Duke Ellington
    00:03:06
    1940
  • 8
    Linger Awhile
    Duke Ellington
    Vincent Rose
    00:03:25
    1940
  • 9
    Charlie The Chulo
    Duke Ellington
    Duke Ellington
    00:03:04
    1940
  • 10
    Lament for Javanette
    Duke Ellington
    Billy Strayhorn
    00:02:51
    1940
  • 11
    A Lull At Dawn
    Duke Ellington
    Duke Ellington
    00:03:28
    1940
  • 12
    Ready Eddy
    Duke Ellington
    Barney Bigard
    00:03:12
    1940
  • 13
    Some Saturday
    Duke Ellington
    Rex Stewart
    00:02:58
    1941
  • 14
    Subtle Slough
    Duke Ellington
    Duke Ellington
    00:03:14
    1941
  • 15
    Menelik (The Lion Of Judah)
    Duke Ellington
    Rex Stewart
    00:03:18
    1941
  • 16
    Poor Bubber
    Duke Ellington
    Rex Stewart
    00:03:20
    1941
  • 17
    Squaty Roo
    Duke Ellington
    Johnny Hodges
    00:02:24
    1941
  • 18
    Passion Flower
    Duke Ellington
    Billy Strayhorn
    00:03:08
    1941
  • 19
    Things Ain’t What They Used To Be
    Duke Ellington
    Mercer Ellington
    00:03:37
    1941
  • 20
    Goin’ Out The Back Way
    Duke Ellington
    Johnny Hodges
    00:02:42
    1941
  • 21
    Brown Suede
    Duke Ellington
    Duke Ellington
    00:03:07
    1941
  • 22
    Noir Bleu
    Duke Ellington
    Billy Strayhorn
    00:03:16
    1941
  • 23
    ‘C’ Blues
    Duke Ellington
    Duke Ellington
    00:02:54
    1941
  • 24
    June
    Duke Ellington
    Barney Bigard
    00:03:16
    1941
Booklet

CLICK TO DOWNLOAD THE BOOKLET

DUKE AT HIS VERY BEST

The Jimmy Blanton - Billy Strayhorn - Ben Webster Sessions

Legendary Works

1940-1942

Réalisé par Alain Pailler et Tony Baldwin, ce coffret 4 CD a bénéficié d’une restauration particulièrement méticuleuse qui permet d’apprécier le Duke Ellington Orchestra en son âge d’or comme si vous y étiez.

Ces sessions légendaires des années 1940-1942 incluent les plus grands classiques ellingtoniens, arrangés de main de maître par le Duke comme par son bras droit Billy Strayhorn : de Ko-Ko à Take The ‘A’ Train, Perdido ou Harlem Air-Shaft. En outre, on y retrouve, à leur meilleur, certains des monstres sacrés de la Swing Era : Cootie Williams ou Ray Nance (trompette), Rex Stewart (cornet), Joe Nanton et Lawrence Brown (trombone) ou bien encore Barney Bigard (clarinette), Johnny Hodges, Ben Webster et Harry Carney (saxophones) ainsi que le jeune contrebassiste prodige Jimmy Blanton.

Des enregistrements essentiels de l’histoire du jazz.          Patrick Frémeaux

 

« La plus grande concentration de chefs-d’œuvre dans l’histoire du jazz. »

“The greatest concentration of masterpieces in the history of jazz“

William P. Gottlieb

 

This 4-CD set was produced by Alain Pailler and Tony Baldwin from meticulously restored originals that let you relive the Duke Ellington Orchestra’s golden age as though you were right there. These legendary 1940-1942 sessions include Ellington classics such as Ko-Ko, Take The ‘A’ Train, Perdido and Harlem Air-Shaft, masterfully arranged by the Duke himself and his right-hand man Billy Strayhorn. The set prominently features several Swing Era giants at their very peak:  Cootie Williams and Ray Nance on trumpets; cornettist Rex Stewart; trombone players Joe Nanton and Lawrence Brown; Barney Bigard on clarinet; Johnny Hodges, Ben Webster and Harry Carney on saxophones, plus the brilliant young double-bass prodigy Jimmy Blanton. It’s a milestone in jazz history and makes essential listening. Patrick Frémeaux

 

CD1

1. Jack The Bear     3:16

 2. Ko-Ko      2:41

 3. Morning Glory    3:16

 4. Conga Brava       2:57

 5. Concerto For Cootie      3:19

 6. Cotton Tail           3:10

 7. Never No Lament           3:18

 8. Dusk         3:17

 9. Bojangles (A Portrait Of Bill Robinson)         2:52

10. A Portrait Of Bert Williams      3:09

11. Blue Goose           3:21

12. Harlem Air-Shaft           2:58

13. All Too Soon        3:30

14. Rumpus In Richmond   2:46

15. Sepia Panorama  3:22

16. In A Mellotone     3:17

17. Warm Valley        3:22

18. Across The Track Blues 2:59

19. Chloë (Song Of The Swamp)    3:25

20. The Sidewalks Of New York     3:15

21. Take The ‘A’ Train         2:55

22. Blue Serge           3:21

23. Jumpin’ Punkins 3:33

 

CD2 

 1. John Hardy’s Wife         3:30

 2. After All   3:20

 3. Are You Sticking?           3:01

 4. Just A-Settin’ and A-Rockin’    3:34

 5. The Giddybug Gallop    3:31

 6. Chocolate Shake 2:53

 7. I Got It Bad (And That Ain’t Good)    3:18

 8. Clementine          2:58

 9. Jump For Joy      2:54

10. Five O’Clock Drag         3:12

11. Rocks In My Bed            3:05

12. Bli-Blip     3:03

13. Chelsea Bridge    2:53

14. Raincheck            2:27

15. I Don’t Know What Kind Of Blues I Got       3:14

16 Perdido     3:09

17. C Jam Blues        2:39

18. Moon Mist           2:58

19. What Am I Here For?    3:25

20. I Don’t Mind       2:49

21. Someone  3:09

22. Main Stem           2:48

23. Johnny Come Lately      2:39

24. Sentimental Lady           3:02

 

CD 3 

 1. You, You Darlin’ 3:20

 2. So Far, So Good  2:53

 3. Me and You         2:54

 4. At A Dixie Roadside Diner        2:48

 5. My Greatest Mistake     3:25

 6. There Shall Be No Night            3:10

 7. Five O’Clock Whistle     3:18

 8. The Flaming Sword       3:06

 9. I Never Felt This Way Before   3:29

10. Flamingo  3:24

11. The Girl In My Dreams (Tries To Look Like You)     3:18

12. Bakiff       3:23

13. The Brown-Skin Gal (In The Calico Gown)   3:08

14. Moon Over Cuba           3:10

15. What Good Would It Do?         2:45

16. My Little Brown Book   3:12

17. Hayfoot Strawfoot          2:33

18. A Slip Of The Lip (Can Sink A Ship)   2:53

19. Sherman Shuffle 2:38

20. Pitter Panther Patter     3:02

21. Body And Soul    3:10

22. Sophisticated Lady        2:44

23. Mr. J.B. Blues      3:05

 

CD4

 1. Good Queen Bess           3:00

 2. Day Dream          2:55

 3. That’s The Blues, Old Man       2:55

 4. Junior Hop          3:07

 5. Without A Song   2:45

 6. My Sunday Gal   3:09

 7. Mobile Bay          3:06

 8. Linger Awhile      3:25

 9. Charlie The Chulo         3:04

10. Lament for Javanette     2:51

11. A Lull At Dawn   3:28

12. Ready Eddy        3:12

13. Some Saturday    2:58

14. Subtle Slough      3:14

15. Menelik (The Lion Of Judah)   3:18

16. Poor Bubber       3:20

17. Squaty Roo          2:24

18. Passion Flower    3:08

19. Things Ain’t What They Used To Be   3:37

20. Goin’ Out The Back Way          2:42

21. Brown Suede       3:07

22. Noir Bleu 3:16

23. ‘C’ Blues  2:54

24. June         3:16

 

KO-KO

TAKE THE A TRAIN

PERDIDO

HARLEM AIR-SHAFT

IN A MELLOW TONE

C JAM BLUES

CHELSEA BRIDGE

 

 

DUKE AT HIS VERY BEST

The Jimmy Blanton-
Billy Strayhorn-
Ben Webster Sessions

Legendary Works 1940-1942

It’s Glory

A la mémoire d’Alain Tercinet

 

Parue en 1973, l’autobiographie de Duke Ellington n’attente pas à ce que fut presque toujours l’image de l’intéressé sur la place publique ; celle d’un séducteur courtois, peu avare en digressions frivoles ou propos emphatiques, multipliant ronds de jambe et compliments un brin futiles à l’adresse d’à peu près tout le monde. Le Duke ne nous aimait-il pas à la folie ? Du moins se plaisait-il à le répéter soir après soir, usant d’un pluriel de majesté. A le lire, le grand chef d’orchestre ne nous permet guère de pénétrer les arcanes de son génie créateur tant il se contente d’exhiber d’un bout à l’autre de cet ouvrage ce qui ressortit au seul régime des apparences. Etonnamment disert quand il s’agit d’évoquer divers souvenirs sans grand intérêt, à l’inverse Ellington ne s’attarde guère sur ce que nous sommes en droit de considérer comme les plus beaux paysages sonores de son duché musical.

« En 1940, nous tenions la grande forme », confiera-t-il de manière lapidaire à ses lecteurs, lesquels n’en obtiendront pas plus de sa part concernant la période qu’il est désormais impossible de considérer autrement que comme le sommet de sa carrière artistique. Dans cette autobiographie (Music is My Mistress) dont la traduction française se fit attendre pendant presque un demi-siècle, Duke parle, d’abondance, alignant force anecdotes et coups de chapeau, mais il ne nous dit pas grand-chose. Seule sa musique. Et plus particulièrement celle des années 1940-1942.

A relire ces pages qui sautent du coq à l’âne et nous laissent en permanence sur notre faim, nous comprenons que le seul Ellington qui n’ait pas été en représentation permanente – célébrité oblige – fut sans doute celui des fins de nuit solitaires, des petits matins partagés avec les 88 touches de son clavier, à court de cigarettes et les poches sous les yeux un peu plus lourdes que la veille. Tout comme celui des séances d’enregistrement dont nul acteur ne peut plus témoigner ici-bas. Aussi n’est-ce pas au souvenir d’Ellington conversant avec un journaliste qu’il convient de demander des éclaircissements sur les somptuosités d’un moment assez unique dans l’histoire de la musique. Depuis la disparition du maestro au mois de mai 1974, biographies méticuleuses ou études fort savantes se sont multipliées en librairie pour le plus grand bonheur des passionnés. Privilégiant l’analyse à l’anecdote, il s’en trouve quelques-unes (Rattenbury, Tucker) pour enrichir nos connaissances de l’Ellingtonie, univers musical sans lequel la main droite du jazz serait amputée de son majeur.

Tout au long des années 1930, Ellington ne cessa de développer et d’approfondir une très singulière science de l’orchestration puisant ressources et inspiration dans les idiosyncrasies de ses différents musiciens ; ce qui se traduisit, « dans le jeu d’ensemble, par une extrême individualisation des timbres {…} que Duke Ellington sut exploiter avec un sens exceptionnel de la plastique sonore » (André Hodeir). Conception peu orthodoxe que seul un compositeur/arrangeur autodidacte, ou quasiment, pouvait mettre en œuvre et qui explique en grande partie les réussites majuscules des années 1940 à 1942 ; celles-ci amplement préparées sur une longue période (1929-1939) avec la collaboration féconde d’un noyau dur de fidèles (Nanton, Carney, Bigard, Hodges, Williams...), ceux-là mêmes qui constitueront l’ossature de la formation qu’il convient pourtant de désigner du nom des derniers arrivants. Par ordre d’entrée au cours de l’année 1939 : Billy Strayhorn, Jimmy Blanton, Ben Webster. Car outre la pleine maturation artistique du chef d’orchestre et la stabilité de son personnel depuis la fin des années 1920, l’adjonction de ces trois fortes personnalités musicales permit au Duke Ellington Orchestra de franchir un cap supplémentaire pour atteindre les plus hautes marches sur l’échelle de la création jazzistique.

La critique ellingtonienne (historiographie ou musicologie) a connu un essor considérable au cours du dernier quart de siècle. Nous devons ainsi à Walter van de Leur d’avoir enfin levé le voile sur l’apport véritable de Billy Strayhorn à l’orchestre d’Ellington (Something To Live For : The Music of B.S.). Musicologue chevronné, Walter a donc passé au microscope la moindre partition de la main de Billy, ne prêtant pas moins d’attention à celles du Duke. D’où il ressort, s’agissant de la période qui nous intéresse, que si la collaboration entre les deux hommes fut assez limitée en 1940, elle se renforça de matière notable au cours des deux années suivantes. L’étude des partitions de Billy Strayhorn à laquelle s’est livré Walter van de Leur pendant une dizaine d’années lui a notamment permis de comprendre que Duke et Billy concevaient leurs compositions comme des pièces orchestrales au plein sens du terme. L’un comme l’autre avaient pour habitude d’orchestrer tout naturellement au fur et à mesure qu’ils composaient, l’un directement sur partition (Strayhorn), l’autre au piano (Ellington). Subtilités techniques qui n’intéresseront pas obligatoirement l’auditeur, on s’en doute. Reste que Strayhorn aurait donc créé, au sein même de l’Ellingtonie, un univers musical distinct et autonome s’alimentant à une source mélodique, rythmique et harmonique différente de celle de son prestigieux employeur et associé. Ce dont témoignent plusieurs pièces enregistrées par le Duke Ellington Orchestra en 1941 et 1942. Engagé dans un premier temps pour soulager Ellington d’une partie de ses tâches multiples, la présence de Strayhorn aux côtés du Duke permit à celui-ci d’approfondir sa relation symbiotique avec l’orchestre, partenaire essentiel dans la mise au point des arrangements et créateur à part entière du répertoire par son travail d’interprétation. Billy Strayhorn, musicien de formation classique, né en 1915 à Dayton (Ohio), apportera sa pierre à l’édifice, modifiant tantôt tel détail d’une partition, fournissant à l’occasion un arrangement intégral avant de donner ses propres compositions. Aucun autre ensemble de jazz d’un format comparable ne possédait alors une direction bicéphale aussi talentueuse et inspirée que le Duke Ellington Orchestra cuvée 1940-1942.

Ceux qui sont aimés des dieux meurent jeunes, si l’on en croit les anciens Grecs. Natif de Chattanooga (Tennessee), Jimmy Blanton fut un prodige de la contrebasse. Engagé sur le champ par Duke Ellington qui le découvrit par hasard dans un club de St Louis (Missouri) au mois de septembre 1939, Blanton mourut dans un sanatorium californien au mois de juillet 1942, âgé d’à peine vingt-trois ans. « Personne jusque-là n’avait fait entendre une sonorité si parfaitement découpée, tout à la fois vigoureuse et souple, puissante et gracieuse », dira Gunther Schuller, soulignant au passage que Blanton fut le premier contrebassiste dans l’histoire du jazz à démontrer que l’on pouvait faire résonner les notes en jouant pizzicato. Ajoutons à cette innovation capitale, synonyme d’accession à une plénitude sonore, un tempo sans faille et une imagination mélodique à peu près inépuisable, parfaite alliance de swing et de musicalité. « Ce fut un choc pour tout le monde », déclarera le contrebassiste Milt Hinton, exprimant ainsi le sentiment éprouvé par tous ses confrères. Le saxophoniste Art Pepper a sans doute résumé mieux que quiconque le sentiment commun, critiques et mélomanes indivis : « Jimmy Blanton – probablement le plus grand bassiste de tous les temps. »

Au panthéon du saxophone ténor dans sa période « classique » - qui fut peut-être son âge d’or – figurent bien évidemment Coleman Hawkins et Lester Young. Si l’influence de Lester s’exerça un peu plus tard que celle de Hawkins, principalement sur les ténors de la West Coast au cours des années 1950, le disciple le plus remarquable de Hawk, qui n’en manquait pas, fut peut-être Benjamin Francis Webster, né en 1909, tantôt surnommé La Brute eu égard à certaines manières un peu rugueuses, tantôt Grenouille en raison d’une légère exophtalmie. Originaire de Kansas City (Missouri), cité pour romans noirs où le gratin jazzistique exsudait swing et blues par tous les pores, Webster n’eut de cesse d’intégrer la formation ducale après s’être transporté chez tous les grands noms de la profession (Bennie Moten, Andy Kirk, Fletcher Henderson…). « Sous l’influence d’Ellington, le style de Webster s’épanouit de manière considérable : sa sonorité percutante, légèrement brumeuse, ses formidables emportements rythmiques, son timbre râpeux identifiable entre tous dans les moments de tension jouèrent un rôle-clé dans l’élaboration de nombreux chefs-d’œuvre ellingtoniens de cette période ». Ainsi se trouve très justement résumé (New Grove Dictionary of Jazz) l’apport de Big Ben Webster aux riches heures du Duc Ellington auprès duquel notre homme fit assaut d’excellence plus souvent qu’à son tour.

Pour reprendre l’exclamation ébahie d’un présentateur radio de l’époque, cet orchestre se présentait donc en ce début des années 1940 comme une « terrific musical aggregation », chaque pupitre alignant depuis des années plusieurs solistes d’une originalité sans pareille, qu’il s’agisse en particulier de Joe « Tricky Sam » Nanton (trombone anthropophone à coloration sépulcrale), Harry Carney (pilier pulpeux dans l’infrarouge des anches), Barney Bigard (bâton de réglisse vif-argent), Johnny Hodges (suprêmaltiste de lyre et de swing), Cootie Williams (trompette de la sphéricité bleutée), Rex Stewart (cornet satchbixien) ou Lawrence Brown (trombone black & tan). Sans oublier, quelques tons en-dessous, Toby Hardwick (altiste diaphane), Juan Tizol (trombone tropical), Fred Guy (guitariste pudique), Wallace Jones (trompette modeste), Sonny Greer (percussionniste caractériel), Ivie Anderson (canari canaille) ou Herb Jeffries (singin’ cowboy dispensateur de guimauves). Autant d’instrumentistes (voire vocalistes) hauts en couleur que le metteur en sons Ellington sut employer au mieux de leurs capacités respectives, que celles-ci aient été proprement renversantes ou plutôt limitées. Sur la palette ducale, la moindre nuance peut être utilisée à bon effet comme en témoigne mieux que tout l’épastrouillante production ellingtonienne des années 1940-1942. A la foire aux individualités jazzistiques, Duke Ellington peut donner l’impression d’avoir fait un marché d’une improbable disparité, mais la cuisine qu’il sert en retour offre d’incomparables saveurs.

 

Pièces maîtresses

« La plus grande concentration de chefs-d’œuvre dans l’histoire du jazz », dira le photographe et critique William P. Gottlieb à propos de la production ellingtonienne en 1940. Ayant mis un terme au partenariat qui le liait à Irving Mills, impresario certes très efficace mais un peu trop rapace, Duke Ellington signa dans la foulée un nouveau contrat avec la compagnie RCA Victor. La qualité de la prise de son rendit aussitôt justice à la capiteuse sonorité de l’orchestre, ce qui n’était pas tout à fait le cas pour les quatre gravures Columbia du 14 février de cette même année, prime apparition sur disque du Blanton-Webster Band. Jack The Bear est une pièce que Billy Strayhorn prétendit avoir retravaillée à la demande du Duke, sauf que la partition autographe est de la main du seul Ellington et fait apparaître ce qui se retrouve sur le disque, dans un ordre certes quelque peu différent. Il n’est donc pas impossible que Strayhorn ait imaginé de modifier l’ordre de ses différentes sections, ou bien qu’Ellington, in fine, n’en ait fait qu’à sa tête. Un cas de figure assez fréquent dans le régime de leur collaboration. Reste que Jack The Bear porte la griffe indubitable de Duke de la première à la dernière mesure, avec sa structure aux allures de patchwork (combinaison d’un blues de 12 mesures et d’un AABA de 32 mesures). Ensembles et solistes y font preuve d’un admirable dynamisme ; la palme d’or revenant au jeune contrebassiste, lequel s’en donne à coeur joie sur l’introduction comme à la conclusion de cette pièce à marquer d’une pierre blanche.

Duke Ellington avait confié au critique Barry Ulanov que Ko-Ko provenait de son opéra inachevé, Boola, véritable arlésienne qui prit en fin de compte une forme peu opératique sous le titre Black, Brown & Beige, ambitieuse suite sur l’histoire du peuple noir en Amérique créée au Carnegie Hall de New York en janvier 1943. Conçu comme une pièce à caractère descriptif, Ko-Ko vise à traduire, au moyen de sonorités et de rythmes appropriés, les bamboulas qui rassemblaient les esclaves à la Nouvelle-Orléans en un lieu appelé Congo Square (Place Congo). Au plan formel, Ko-Ko utilise la structure du blues de 12 mesures, dans la tonalité de mi bémol mineur. Apothéose du style jungle dont la formation s’était fait une spécialité dès le milieu des années 1920, Ko-Ko peut à bon droit être considéré comme le chef-d’œuvre ellingtonien. « Tant par sa forme que par son contenu, un triomphe », déclarera Gunther Schuller. Pièce sauvage, barbare, Ko-Ko déploie ses fascinants sortilèges en alignant sept chorus d’ensemble encadrés par une introduction et une coda. Ellington y a aménagé une série de contrastes violents selon un principe d’antiphonie (call & response) dont l’origine se situe du côté de l’Afrique. La variation d’ensemble (septième et dernier chorus) faisant suite aux breaks de Jimmy Blanton (en walking bass) porte cette pièce d’un expressionnisme radical jusqu’à un paroxysme d’intensité sans équivalent dans l’histoire du jazz orchestral. Aux accents déchirants du trombone de Joe Nanton répond le tachisme pianistique d’Ellington dont les dissonances venues d’un autre monde redoublent celles de l’harmonie générale du morceau, d’une couleur modale presque constante si l’on en croit la musicologie la plus sérieuse. A l’écoute de Ko-Ko, que l’on pourrait qualifier de crescendo in black & blue, on se prend à imaginer quelque étrange cérémonie vaudou contaminée par le génie du jazz – celui de Duke Ellington et de ses hommes au premier chef.

C’est au cours d’une traversée en bateau à bord du Champlain, après une nuit passée à jouer au poker, que le cornettiste Rex Stewart eut au petit matin l’idée de ce Morning Glory (AABA 32) que Duke Ellington se chargea de mettre en forme en toute simplicité pour le cuivre chantant de Rex. Sur une orchestration de premier ordre où le soprano de Johnny Hodges vient rehausser les ensembles de saxophones d’une pointe acidulée, Morning Glory met en valeur l’un des solistes majeurs de la formation ducale dans un registre quelque peu inhabituel pour lui. La ligne mélodique, ravissante, s’y trouve enchassée dans une orchestration particulièrement chaleureuse. Morceau quasi impressionniste, d’un lyrisme délicat, où s’équilibrent tons assourdis et touches de lumière assez vive. On ne connaît pas d’autre version de ce titre. Détail salace : l’expression Morning Glory peut également se comprendre dans un sens… priapique.

Fruit d’une collaboration entre Juan Tizol et Duke Ellington, Conga Brava (AABA 68) se trouvait couplé avec Ko-Ko sur le 78-tours d’origine, en raison de son caractère exotique. Moins connue que Caravan, cette pièce d’une riche polyrythmie au fort parfum de rumba mériterait pourtant d’être aussi célèbre que l’inusable standard de 1937. Au trombone à pistons de Tizol, d’une matité fantomatique sur l’exposé du thème, s’oppose la débordante virilité du saxophone ténor de Webster. Conga Brava abonde en détails excitants, qu’il s’agisse des petits motifs de cuivres syncopés derrière Tizol ou bien encore des tambours africanisants de Sonny Greer, évocateurs de réjouissances caraïbes.

Vanté à bon droit depuis des lustres, Concerto For Cootie a fait l’objet de plusieurs analyses particulièrement méticuleuses de la part de divers musiciens/musicologues. André Hodeir, Gunther Schuller ou Ken Rattenbury ont ainsi placé cette pièce magnifique sous leur microscope. S’il n’est évidemment pas question d’entrer dans le détail de leurs savantes observations, il ressort que Concerto For Cootie (AABA de 38 mesures + ABAC de 16 mesures), aussi consonant que Ko-Ko peut être dissonant, est une composition écrite de bout en bout qui ne laisse aucune place à l’improvisation. Le thème/motif principal - qui donnera plus tard le standard Do Nothin’ Till You Hear From Me - provient d’un trait/d’une phrase que Cootie Williams répétait souvent afin de s’échauffer (huit notes). Quant à l’introduction (huit mesures), si l’on en croit les experts, elle pourrait être de Billy Strayhorn, donnant l’impression d’avoir été plaquée sur le reste de la composition. Unique soliste, Cootie Williams subjugue par sa maîtrise et son talent, usant tantôt d’une sourdine, tantôt d’un plunger (débouche-évier), concluant en pavillon ouvert.

Monument de swing, Cotton Tail réutilise la structure harmonique d’une composition signée George Gershwin maintes fois sollicitée par les jazzmen : I Got Rhythm. Sur ses accords (les fameux rhythm changes), les musiciens de jazz improviseront jusqu’à plus soif pendant des décennies. Cotton Tail parvient à sublimer ce terreau plutôt quelconque pour en extraire un festival de syncopes, substituant au thème de départ, très ordinaire (AABA 32), une mélodie tout en muscles dont la moindre accidence, l’orchestration ou le punch rythmique soulèvent littéralement l’auditeur de sa chaise. La section rythmique fait ici des merveilles, qu’il s’agisse de Jimmy Blanton, au tempo implacable, ou de Sonny Greer, d’une étonnante modernité dans sa façon d’utiliser baguettes ou balais avec un swing assez époustouflant. Mais le véritable héros de cette pièce dont la fulgurance n’a pas pris une ride est le ténor Ben Webster. Son solo de saxophone, aussi brutal qu’inventif, a marqué l’histoire de l’instrument. En outre, s’il n’a été mis en forme par Big Ben (Webster), le chorus d’ensemble joué par le pupitre des saxophones que l’on entend déferler dans la dernière partie, après les fracassantes interventions de Harry Carney au baryton puis de Duke au piano (en stride), ce chorus d’ensemble a très vraisemblablement été suggéré sinon apporté par Webster lui-même et s’inscrit dans la parfaite continuité de sa mémorable improvisation. Cotton Tail, qui désigne la petite queue blanche du lapin, demeure l’une des contributions majeures du Duke Ellington Orchestra en matière de swing. Une musicologie très fiable nous assure en outre que cette réussite majeure serait annonciatrice du bebop.

Enregistré au cours de la même séance, Never No Lament est à peine moins remarquable. Cette pièce réutilise la grille (les accords) d’une autre composition signée Duke Ellington datée de 1938, I Let A Song Go Out Of My Heart (AABA 32). La mélodie de Never No Lament est très accrocheuse et la souplesse de son tempo medium particulièrement délectable. Trois solistes de l’orchestre s’y font entendre au meilleur de leur forme : Lawrence Brown, Johnny Hodges, Cootie Williams, les deux derniers rivalisant de sensualité expressive. Après avoir reçu des paroles, ce morceau deviendra un standard du jazz vocal sous le titre Don’t Get Around Much Anymore. Mais aucune version de ce thème n’a jamais pu rivaliser avec Never No Lament.

Dusk (AABA 16) procède de cette veine impressionniste typiquement ellingtonienne qualifiée à bon droit de mood style. Pièce d’atmosphère. Comme sur Mood Indigo (1930) ou Azure (1937), le voicing très particulier de Dusk associe trois instruments joués straight (i.e. sans aucun vibrato ou effet expressionniste) ; à savoir : clarinette dans le registre grave, cornet et trombone munis de sourdines dans les registres medium ou aigu, inversant ainsi les tessitures « naturelles » de ces différents instruments. Ceux-ci constituaient en général la section mélodique des formations néo-orléanaises qui, élargie à plusieurs voix, engendrera plus tard l’instrumentation des big bands. Coloriste d’exception, Ellington était depuis longtemps passé maître dans cet exercice très particulier consistant à imaginer des alliages de timbres entendus nulle part ailleurs. Rex Stewart et Lawrence Brown en vedettes.

Après ceux de Billy Strayhorn (Weely, 1939) ou de Willie ‘The Lion’ Smith (Portrait Of The Lion, 1939), Duke s’attache à brosser un portrait musical de Bill Robinson, alias Bojangles, tap dancer émérite que l’on peut notamment voir encore à l’œuvre (il avait alors 65 ans) dans le film d’Andrew Stone, Stormy Weather (1943). Tout au long de sa carrière, Ellington rendra ainsi hommage à diverses figures célèbres de la culture noire américaine. Pièce ô combien dansante, Bojangles (ABAB 16) permet à Ben Webster de se pousser avantageusement sous les feux de la rampe.

Autre portrait : celui de Bert Williams, acteur de Vaudeville spécialisé dans les spectacles de Black Minstrels. « C’était l’acteur le plus drôle que j’aie vu et aussi le plus triste », a dit de lui le comique W.C. Fields. Bert Williams, dont l’heure de gloire coïncide avec l’époque du ragtime (l’ancêtre du jazz), disparut en 1922. Ellington (né en 1899) avait donc pu le voir sur scène dans sa jeunesse. Quoi qu’il en soit, Duke lui rend ici un hommage musical qui nous vaut cette pièce assez singulière. Le thème principal, plutôt mélancolique et d’allure quelque peu sinueuse, ondoyante, est exposé avec un phrasé legato par le cornet de Rex Stewart, tout comme les anches sur l’introduction, tandis que les trombones commencent par répliquer staccato. Un art des contrastes. Nous avons même droit à un passage en phrasé de masse (orchestre à l’unisson) juste avant la première intervention de Nanton. C’est en vain que l’on chercherait dans tout le jazz un morceau qui, d’un point de vue orchestral ou mélodique, ressemble à celui-ci. Outre l’originalité manifeste de l’écriture, ce sont les brèves interventions du tromboniste Tricky Sam Nanton qui frappent peut-être le plus sur A Portrait Of Bert Williams (combinaison d’un thème AABA de 16 mesures et d’un blues de 12 mesures).

Selon toute vraisemblance, Blue Goose fait référence à une compagnie de transport américaine du même nom dont l’enseigne représentait précisément une oie bleue. Ce titre permet d’apprécier le grand Johnny Hodges au saxophone soprano, instrument qu’il délaissera bientôt pour se consacrer à l’alto. A côté du train, source d’inspiration récurrente pour Duke, il y eut donc aussi l’autocar. D’un point de vue moins anecdotique, outre les parties solistes, admirables, on peut apprécier les tutti d’anches très dissonants. Difficile de demeurer insensible au charme un peu mélancolique qui émane de cette pièce (AABA 32) prise dans un tempo medium-lent propice à la rêverie. Tristesse et beauté, pour emprunter un titre au romancier japonais Kawabata.

Œuvre censément descriptive, Harlem Air-Shaft (AABA 32) est d’abord et surtout l’une des plus belles réussites ellingtoniennes. D’une exubérance rare, rythmé de manière proprement irrésistible – Blanton s’y montre « hénaurme » - , Harlem Air-Shaft est tout aussi remarquable par sa forme que par son exécution, laquelle en dit long sur l’habileté du Duke à obtenir de ses hommes le meilleur d’eux-mêmes. Plusieurs motifs thématiques s’entrecroisent tout au long de cette pièce d’une tension extrême. Cootie Williams, Barney Bigard ou Sonny Greer y insufflent une énergie proprement volcanique. Œuvre dont le caractère extrêmement maîtrisé n’a pas eu pour effet de brider le swing torrentiel engendré par les solistes comme par les différents pupitres de l’orchestre, Harlem Air-Shaft ne nous apprend peut-être pas grand-chose sur la vie d’un immeuble new-yorkais dans sa partie uptown mais nous confirme dans l’idée qu’en 1940, le Duke Ellington Orchestra dominait la concurrence de la tête et des épaules.

Ben Webster, qui possédait plus d’une corde à son arc, excellait dans l’interprétation des ballades. En témoigne All Too Soon (AABA 32) qui lui permet d’étaler toute sa classe dans ce registre où la virilité la plus manifeste cache mal un désir de séduction parfois ostentatoire, conjugaison de finesse et d’autorité mise en valeur par la sophistication de l’écriture ellingtonienne. Le contrechant de saxophone alto derrière le trombone bouché de Lawrence Brown sur l’exposé du thème est dû à Toby Hardwick. Agrémentée de paroles, cette très jolie mélodie deviendra un standard du jazz vocal.

L’orchestre parvient à maintenir une tension électrisante d’un bout à l’autre de Rumpus in Richmond (AABA 32), pièce enlevée aux allures de fiesta (rumpus = raffut, boucan) qui se distingue par sa tonicité, sa gaieté. C’est dans le format court et à partir de structures simples qu’Ellington savait donner le meilleur de lui-même, se nourrissant de la créativité de ses musiciens et la stimulant à son tour en leur proposant les partitions les plus excitantes qui soient. La brûlante férocité dont fait ici preuve Cootie Williams, multipliant les effets de growl, a quelque chose de jouissif. En grande forme ce jour-là, Sonny Greer apporte un soutien très efficace avec sa cymbale charleston.

A l’origine de Sepia Panorama, Billy Strayhorn avait commencé par concocter un arrangement sur le très populaire Tuxedo Junction d’Erskine Hawkins, mais il avait laissé ce travail inachevé. Ellington qui, de son côté, avait conçu une partition (de vingt-huit mesures) comportant deux sections contrastées (l’une de ses marques de fabrique), eut alors l’idée de retravailler le thème de Hawkins en faisant disparaître celui que Strayhorn destinait aux saxophones. Les vides furent comblés par des interventions du saxophoniste baryton Harry Carney et Duke se chargea lui-même au piano de la phrase qui permettait de relier sa propre composition (en fa) à celle de Strayhorn (en si bémol). Ellington ajouta ensuite deux parties en solo sur le blues de douze mesures, confiées à la contrebasse de Jimmy Blanton et au saxophone de Ben Webster ; après quoi il se contenta de récapituler les trois parties précédentes dans l’ordre inverse. Sepia Panorama nous éclaire sur les méthodes de travail propres au Duke qui, bien souvent, n’hésitait pas à procéder selon des techniques de « collage » semblables à celles ayant engendré ce morceau. Forme « en miroir » pourrait-on dire, et dont on ne trouve aucun équivalent dans le jazz des années 1940.

Pour In A Mellotone comme pour Cotton Tail, Duke a réutilisé la grille harmonique d’un vieux thème qui n’est pas de sa plume, en l’occurrence Rose Room (1917), signé Art Hickman. Mais celui qu’il a posé sur la séquence harmonique empruntée surclasse Rose Room de cent coudées. L’écriture d’In A Mellotone (ABAC 32) est exemplaire de la façon dont le Duke concevait la mise en œuvre de la dynamique orchestrale. Comme pour Ko-Ko ou Concerto For Cootie, Ellington s’appuie sur la formule antiphonique call & response (appel-réponse), venue tout droit de la musique religieuse noire (gospel) et fait dialoguer non seulement les différentes sections entre elles mais aussi les solistes avec les différents pupitres. Ainsi, sur l’exposé du thème, les saxophones, emmenés par le robuste baryton de Harry Carney, répondent à la section des trombones. Puis Cootie, à la trompette, entame avec la rangée des saxophones une conversation d’un naturel époustouflant (ce qui paraît improvisé ne l’est peut-être pas et ce qui est forcément écrit paraît improvisé), suivi par Johnny Hodges à l’alto qui nous gratifie d’un solo en tempo doublé. Deux bijoux de soli sur un chef-d’œuvre d’arrangement ; le tout interprété avec une admirable décontraction, in a mellow tone.

Warm Valley a beau avoir été enregistré(e) à Chicago, c’est du côté de la Californie que se situe la chaude vallée qui avait inspiré cette composition à Duke Ellington. Au cours d’un voyage en train, admirant un paysage de douces collines qui défilait sous ses yeux, l’image d’une femme alanguie exposant en toute innocence sa... chaude vallée (…) était venue à l’esprit du Duke. Eros toujours à l’affût. D’où cette ballade particulièrement sensuelle confiée au plus sensuel de ses musiciens : Johnny Hodges. Le traitement du matériau sonore selon Hodges procède d’un voluptueux étirement de la note (glissando) qui est comme un gémissement de plaisir mais toujours contrôlé avec une extrême délicatesse, un infini doigté, sorte d’orgasme très doux. Warm Valley (AABA 32) était le morceau préféré de Count Basie.

Across The Track Blues = Le blues de l’autre côté de la voie - ferrée, bien sûr. Dans la plupart des villes nord-américaines, petites ou moyennes, la voie ferrée signalait la limite (ligne de démarcation ?) entre la ville blanche d’un côté, la ville noire de l’autre. Ce blues simple et de bon goût qu’a composé Ellington renvoie bien sûr aux quartiers noirs dans lesquels l’orchestre devait chercher à se loger lorsqu’il se trouvait sur la route. S’il ne possède pas la sophistication de Ko-Ko ou de Blue Serge, Across The Track Blues, avec son allure des plus relax, ne manque ni de charme ni d’intérêt. Qu’il s’agisse des ensembles orchestraux ou des parties solistes qui s’y intègrent avec une parfaite aisance, tout concourt ici à établir un climat aussi détendu que chaleureux. Car contrairement à une idée reçue, s’exprimer sur l’idiome du blues n’équivaut pas nécessairement à broyer du noir. La preuve par Duke.

Quiconque a lu L’Ecume des jours de Boris Vian se souvient que la malheureuse héroïne au poumon envahi par un nénuphar a pour prénom Chloé. Lequel fait directement référence à Duke Ellington, cité à plusieurs reprises dans le roman. La Chloé de Boris sort tout droit de chez Duke qui n’a pourtant ni composé ni même arrangé Chloë (ABAC 32) contrairement à ce que pourrait laisser accroire la question posée par Colin à celle dont il va s’éprendre (« Etes-vous arrangée par Duke Ellington ? »). C’est Billy Strayhorn, l’alter ego d’Ellington, qui s’est chargé de mettre en forme ce titre. Une splendide réussite. Mention spéciale à Joe Nanton et Ben Webster.

The Sidewalks Of New York (ABAB 32) n’est ni de la plume d’Ellington ni de celle de Billy Strayhorn, lequel ne semble pas non plus en avoir été l’arrangeur. Ces trottoirs de New York transpirent la bonne humeur, la gaieté, la joie de vivre. Des différents solistes sollicités sur ce morceau, c’est Joe Nanton qui se taille la part du lion et fait sans doute la plus grosse impression. Tricky Sam ne parvient pas seulement à imiter la voix humaine, ce qui serait somme toute assez puéril, mais à faire passer celle-ci, transfigurée, au timbre de son instrument, anthropomorphisant le trombone, comme si celui-ci était un prolongement de l’appareil phonateur, sorte d’appendice cuivré qui permettrait à la voix d’atteindre, via sourdines et déboucheur, à son expression la plus émouvante.

Composition de Billy Strayhorn, Take The ‘A’ Train (AABA 32), qui allait bientôt devenir l’indicatif de l’orchestre, aurait pu demeurer un titre mort-né si Mercer Ellington ne l’avait, paraît-il, récupéré in extremis dans la poubelle. Strayhorn pensait en effet que le style de cette partition, jouant sur les oppositions entre différents pupitres, aurait mieux convenu à la formation de Fletcher Henderson qu’à celle du Duke. Surtout, cet écrin orchestral des plus swingant enchâsse un formidable solo de trompette dû à Ray Nance (avec sourdine puis en pavillon ouvert) qui est d’emblée devenu un classique. A l’instar de ce que faisait souvent Ellington, Strayhorn a ici réutilisé la grille d’un standard intitulé Exactly Like You. Mais comme pour Cotton Tail ou In A Mellotone, le nouveau thème coiffe son modèle de plusieurs longueurs sur la ligne d’arrivée. Etonnamment, cette petite célébration du métro new-yorkais a été enregistrée en Californie.

Ayant fouiné dans les archives ellingtoniennes conservées à Washington, Walter van de Leur a pu exhumer la partition autographe de Blue Serge et constater que celle-ci était de la main d’Ellington, corroborant ainsi le témoignage de Billy Strayhorn selon lequel ce morceau avait bel et bien été orchestré - et vraisemblablement composé de A à Z - par Duke. Blue Serge s’apparente à un blues par ses choix harmoniques, moins par sa forme puisqu’il procède par séquences de huit mesures, dans la tonalité de do mineur. Soumises à un processus de transformation permanente au fur et à mesure que la pièce progresse, les textures sonores comptent parmi les plus fascinantes qu’ait jamais fait entendre l’orchestre de Duke Ellington. On ne saurait imaginer de chant funèbre plus poignant que celui confié aux voix de Rex Stewart, Joe Nanton, Duke ou Ben Webster sur Blue Serge dont les arrière-plans harmoniques conservent toujours une qualité mélodique assez transcendante. Quant au titre, à quoi ou à qui fait-il référence ? Mystère...

Avant toute chose, il convient d’éclaircir un point. Jumpin’ Punkins (AABA 32) est officiellement attribué à Mercer Ellington, fils de son père. Celui-ci ne fut vraisemblablement que le prête-nom de son illustre paternel qui eut besoin de faire endosser plusieurs de ses compositions au moment où un conflit opposant sa maison d’édition (ASCAP) aux stations de radio l’empêchait d’interpréter ses œuvres sur les ondes. Une fois résolu le conflit en question, le talent supposé de Mercer Ellington s’évanouit aussitôt. No comment. En dehors de ses qualités propres, Jumpin’ Punkins permet d’entendre le batteur de l’orchestre, Sonny Greer, sur quelques breaks en solo, une fois n’est pas coutume. Sonny Greer n’était certes pas un soliste de la batterie, encore moins un virtuose de l’instrument mais il possédait des réflexes de percussionniste-coloriste assez étonnants si l’on en croit divers témoignages qui nous sont parvenus.

Un trimardeur du nom de John Hardy a laissé une trace dans l’Histoire des USA. Pendu après avoir tué quelqu’un au cours d’une rixe, le John Hardy en question est passé à la postérité grâce à une ballade qui fut reprise par quantité de folk singers. Quant à sa femme… put-elle se réjouir en le voyant se balancer au bout d’une corde ? Quoi qu’il en soit, balancer est justement ce que fait sur John Hardy’s Wife (ABAC 16) la formation du Duke au sein de laquelle brille le cornet de Rex Stewart. Secondé-magnifié par la cymbale de Sonny Greer, Rex y fait montre d’un drive assez phénoménal en même temps que l’orchestre carbure tel un bolide grâce au formidable moteur quatre-temps dont l’a doté Jimmy Blanton. Il est évidemment permis de douter que la mise en forme de cette pièce doive quelque chose à son signataire officiel. Sans parler de la direction d’orchestre.

After All (AABA 32), signé Billy Strayhorn, se voit confié au majestueux alto de Johnny Hodges, lequel deviendra d’ailleurs l’interprète de prédilection - et de référence - des ballades strayhorniennes. Après avoir occupé une position assez mal définie dans l’organisation ducale (parolier, arrangeur, pianiste en second), Billy prit du galon dès 1941, année où s’affirma au grand jour son immense talent de compositeur. Strayhorn a pris place derrière le clavier, Duke ayant eu l’élégance de lui céder son tabouret. Moins économe et plus fleuri que celui d’Ellington, son jeu de piano ne se refuse pas quelques traits ornementaux, possibles reliquats de sa formation académique. Aux côtés de Hodges, sans doute l’altiste le plus lyrique de l’histoire du jazz, se fait entendre ici Lawrence Brown, trombone parfois déprécié tant sa manière s’apparente, en tempo lent, à celle d’un Tommy Dorsey. Rapprochement qui n’a du reste rien d’infamant.

En 1936, Ellington avait déjà permis à Barney Bigard de briller sur Clarinet Lament. Rebelote avec Are You Sticking? (AABC 34). Dans l’idiome des jazzmen, black stick désigne la clarinette. Intitulé à double sens donc puisque l’interrogation s’adresse d’abord à l’auditeur (to stick = coller, adhérer). Comprenons : est-ce que vous accrochez ? Le contraire serait assez difficile vu le dynamisme contagieux de cette pièce. La partie centrale, qui permet d’entendre Bigard dialoguer avec l’orchestre, confirme ce que l’on avait déjà pu constater sur d’autres titres ; à savoir que les parties écrites pour les ensembles sont exécutées avec un tel naturel qu’elles paraissent improvisées.

Cosigné Ellington-Strayhorn (Duke à la composition, Billy à l’orchestration), Just A-Settin’ and A-Rockin’ (AABA 32) est avant tout un costume taillé sur mesure pour le saxophone de Ben Webster, lequel nous livre ici une délectable improvisation, sous forme de dialogue avec l’orchestre ; procédé récurrent dans l’écriture ellingtonienne. Le tempo medium, particulièrement confortable, permet au grand ténor de sculpter littéralement chacune des notes qu’il souffle. Muni de paroles, ce morceau connaîtra par la suite un certain succès.

The Giddybug Gallop (AABA 32) = La chevauchée fantastique selon Duke Ellington. Vu le tempo adopté (upbeat), il doit au moins s’agir de l’attaque de la diligence par les Apaches. Lorsque certains faisaient remarquer à Johnny Hodges que Charlie Parker pouvait jouer sur des tempi ultrarapides, Hodges leur suggérait d’écouter ce morceau - manière de clore le débat ? Cela dit, Parker ne donnait jamais l’impression de courir derrière le tempo alors qu’ici Hodges fait un peu songer à un chien qui chercherait à se mordre la queue. Sonny Greer, aux balais, tire la langue. Ellington n’a pas composé beaucoup de morceaux pris sur un rythme aussi rapide au cours de sa carrière. Bigard et Nanton s’en donnent à coeur joie.

L’orchestre de Duke Ellington passa en Californie une bonne partie de l’année 1941, multipliant les enregistrements sur place. Chocolate Shake provient du spectacle Jump For Joy, présenté dans un théâtre de Los Angeles à partir du mois de mai. Introduit par le superbe press roll de Sonny Greer, Chocolate Shake (AABA 32) permet de découvrir la chanteuse titulaire de l’orchestre (depuis 1932), Ivie Anderson. Stylistiquement, ce morceau nous ramène une douzaine d’années en arrière, lorsque la formation d’Ellington faisait les beaux soirs du Cotton Club de Harlem. Pièce d’allure pseudo-exotique. Les paroles, signées Paul Francis Webster, ne manquent pas d’humour : « Venus de Milo had charms/She gave the Greeks quite a break/Now that poor girl is minus her arms/Doin’ the chocolate shake ». Jump For Joy, qui fit les délices d’un Orson Welles, s’en prenait ouvertement aux stéréotypes liés aux Noirs d’Amérique, expédiant l’Oncle Tom aux oubliettes.

Superbe ballade cosignée Ellington-Strayhorn, I Got It Bad (And That Ain’t Good) devint très vite l’un des chevaux de bataille de Johnny Hodges, lequel atteint ici une fois encore au sublime en se contentant de décliner la mélodie, futur standard du jazz et de la chanson américaine. On peut entendre quelques notes cristallines de célesta jouées ici ou là derrière Ivie Anderson. L’utilisateur de cet instrument n’est autre que Billy Strayhorn. I Got It Bad (AABA 32) provient également de la « revusicale bronzée » (sic) Jump For Joy. Il existe même un soundie (petit film musical), daté de fin 1941, sur lequel on peut voir et entendre l’orchestre interpréter ce titre.

Clementine (AABA 32) appartient au seul Billy Strayhorn. Mais le dialogue entre les anches et les trombones sur l’exposé du thème principal ne s’inspirerait-il pas des techniques ducales ? Le « pont » (partie B) compte parmi les plus jolies choses composées par Billy. Johnny Hodges et Rex Stewart se taillent la part du lion ; le jeu de Rex au cornet évoquant de belle manière celui du légendaire Bix Beiderbecke. Clementine, femme ou fruit ? Nous sommes en Californie. Femme-fleur ?

Pièce enlevée, Jump For Joy (AABAC 36) devait effectivement donner envie de sauter de joie lors de sa création à la scène. Habilement soutenus par les froissements-frottements cuivrés de Sonny Greer, Ivie Anderson, Johnny Hodges ou Joe Nanton y font preuve d’un enthousiasme communicatif. Les paroles de cette chanson adressent un adieu nullement nostalgique au sud des Etats-Unis, terre du coton et de la discrimination raciale.

Pièce sans prétention, Five O’Clock Drag (AABA 32) est bâti sur un riff tout ce qu’il y a de plus simple. Ben Webster et Rex Stewart en première ligne. On a presque le sentiment d’avoir affaire ici à une petite formation. L’allure très décontractée de cette interprétation pourrait donner à penser que ce morceau a été conçu à l’improviste, sans grande préparation. Le break de Ben Webster avant l’improvisation de Rex Stewart a plutôt belle allure, tout comme le solo très tonique qu’il prend un peu plus loin. Interprétation d’un bel entrain.

Le bluesman Joe Turner faisait partie du casting de Jump For Joy. Rocks In My Bed étant un blues, ce titre lui échut tout naturellement. Turner fut le premier à l’enregistrer, quelques semaines avant que soit saisie dans la cire cette gravure qui met en vedette Ivie Anderson. Billy Strayhorn au clavier. Duke a écrit lui-même les paroles.

Bli-Blip (AABA 32), également extrait de la revue Jump For Joy, est une pure fantaisie vocale. C’est aussi et surtout l’ultime occasion d’apprécier la fabuleuse pulsation de Jimmy Blanton dont on pourra déguster le dialogue final avec le restant de l’orchestre. Partie chantée et de trompette signées Ray Nance. Ce morceau a également fait l’objet d’un soundie, avec deux membres de la distribution en vedettes, les chanteurs-danseurs Paul White et Mary Bryant.

Chelsea Bridge (AABA 32) est une pièce orchestrale. Les solistes (Tizol ou Webster) interviennent brièvement pour exposer la mélodie et non pour improviser dessus. Ce morceau fut inspiré à Strayhorn par un tableau du peintre Whistler représentant non point le pont de Chelsea mais un autre pont londonien (Battersea Bridge). Si Billy Strayhorn s’est trompé sur le référent pictural, il n’a toutefois pas raté son coup. Chelsea Bridge, qui ne ressemble à rien d’autre dans le jazz des années 1940, demeure l’une des compositions les plus raffinées du répertoire ellingtonien. Ce titre est depuis lors devenu un standard qu’affectionnent nombre de pianistes, en raison de sa mélodie comme de ses harmonies à caractère impressionniste.

Par un jour de pluie sur la côte ouest, Billy Strayhorn composa Raincheck (ABAC 32), terme utilisé lorsque, à cause des intempéries, un spectacle est annulé, ouvrant droit à un billet de remplacement pour une date ultérieure. Ben Webster, dans une forme olympienne, en est la vedette. Les ponctuations (notes piquées) jouées par le pupitre des trombones derrière le solo de Webster ont inspiré l’arrangeur Gil Evans, de son propre aveu. On en retrouve un écho derrière le solo de bugle que prend Miles Davis sur New Rhumba (1957), lequel Miles avait d’ailleurs confié, vers la fin de sa vie, avoir souvent Raincheck dans l’oreille.

I Don’t Know What Kind Of Blues I Got mérite le détour. Dernière pièce enregistrée de l’année 1941 et énième démonstration de l’inventivité dont Ellington savait faire preuve dès qu’il sollicitait la forme ou la couleur du blues. Ceux qui ne jurent que par Big Joe Williams ou John Lee Hooker estimeront sans doute que le blues selon Duke est un peu trop sophistiqué. Alors qu’en réalité, sans en dénaturer la substance, il ne fait qu’ajouter de la forme à une structure passablement figée, répétitive. Quelques accords de piano dissonants en introduction, Bigard puis Webster puis encore Bigard, sa clarinette contrechantée par le trombone de Lawrence Brown, le tout allant crescendo. Avec trois fois rien, Ellington parvient à créer bien plus qu’une ambiance, un paysage sonore à nul autre pareil dans le jazz.

Back East. Bye Bye California & Hello 1942. Perdido est, après Caravan, le plus gros « tube » signé Juan Tizol et l’un des « saucissons » le plus souvent repris par les musiciens de jazz au cours des jam sessions. Un thème tout simple (AABA 32) en forme de riff, exposé ici par Carney sur la partie A et Nance sur la partie B (middle part). Solistes en grande forme, ensembles trapus, section rythmique au taquet.

Enregistré le même jour que Perdido, C Jam Blues est encore plus simple dans la forme : un thème fait de deux notes (!) - do-fa - posées sur les trois accords du blues dans la tonalité de do majeur. D’où le titre. Défilé de solistes, C Jam Blues est demeuré au répertoire de l’orchestre pendant plus de trente ans et a donné lieu à de nombreuses réinterprétations. La version vocale de ce thème a été rebaptisée Duke’s Place.

Moon Mist (AABA 32) permet d’entendre le trompettiste Ray Nance… au violon ! Dans ses mémoires, Mercer Ellington prétend avoir composé la mélodie de ce morceau à partir d’une suite harmonique fournie par son paternel ; celui-ci corrigeant tout ce qui n’allait pas. Ce qui, déjà, tend à réduire la brumeuse contribution du rejeton à la portion congrue. Littéralement, Moon Mist renvoie à l’espèce de halo que l’on peut voir parfois autour de la lune. Pièce atmosphérique, propice à la mélancolie.

Difficile de savoir si l’interrogation, What Am I Here For?, présente un caractère existentiel ? métaphysique ? ou bien si elle doit être comprise dans un sens bien plus prosaïque ? Autrement dit, qu’est-ce que je fiche ici ? à New York où l’orchestre était donc revenu en ce mois de février 1942. What Am I Here For? (ABAC 32) fait partie des compositions ellingtoniennes qui sont devenues des classiques (ou des standards) du jazz. Duke, au piano, y converse avec le cornet de Rex Stewart avant que celui-ci s’efface devant Ben Webster pour une improvisation en forme de paraphrase qui va crescendo. Le thème est repris fortissimo à la conclusion du morceau.

Signé conjointement par Duke et Billy, I Don’t Mind (AABA 32), n’offre peut-être pas une mélodie aussi inoubliable que celle de I Got It Bad mais le rendu orchestral comme l’interprétation de la chanteuse ne manquent ni de force ni de poignant.

Someone (ABAC 32) est un petit joyau passé quasiment inaperçu. Ce morceau connaîtra une seconde jeunesse au cours des années 1950 après avoir été rebaptisé The Sky Fell Down ; ce qui vous a un petit air de film catastrophe qui faisait défaut à l’intitulé premier, assez transparent. Quelqu’un… mais qui donc au juste ? En tout cas, Hodges, Brown et Nance, qui se chargent de l’animer, ne se réfugient aucunement dans l’anonymat.

Main Stem = l’artère principale. C’est à dire Broadway, la grande avenue new-yorkaise illuminée de jour comme de nuit, également surnommée The Great White Way. Le chemin de lumière. Sans la moindre connotation mystique. Etonnamment, cette célébration assez torride du coeur battant de New York a été enregistrée en Californie où l’orchestre était donc retourné à l’été 1942. La structure harmonique de Main Stem est celle du blues traditionnel de 12 mesures et le thème n’a rien de très sophistiqué puisqu’il s’agit d’un riff assez simple. Sur ce matériau de base, défilent la plupart des solistes de l’orchestre. Une modulation (changement de tonalité) rompt la linéarité du morceau avant l’entrée en scène de Ben Webster suivi de Lawrence Brown. La section rythmique carbure à plein régime.

Johnny Come Lately (AABA 32) est une expression familière qui, selon le contexte, peut désigner un retardataire ou un nouveau venu, voire un parvenu. A qui pensait donc Strayhorn en composant ce morceau ? Interprétation puissante, d’une magnifique sauvagerie. Une harmonie violemment dissonante, des solistes aussi inspirés qu’expressifs. Curieuse d’idée d’avoir sorti Lawrence Brown de sa zone de confort pour le confronter à son collègue de pupitre Joe Nanton sur le terrain d’un expressionnisme brûlant. Ellington a beau n’avoir rien écrit ici, on peut se demander si son bras droit n’a pas cherché à marcher dans ses pas.

Ultime gravure de l’année 1942. C’est avec cette splendide ballade, confiée comme il se doit au plus lyrique des Ellingtoniens, Johnny Hodges, que se clôt un chapitre particulièrement créatif dans la (longue) carrière du Duke Ellington Orchestra. Une grève des enregistrements va bientôt s’abattre sur le monde musical aux USA pendant deux ans. Sentimental Lady (AABA 32) sera adopté(e) un peu plus tard par la confrérie des vocalistes sous le titre I Didn’t Know About You. Après être passés par des hauts et des bas au cours de la décennie 1945-1955, Duke et ses hommes connaîtront d’autres heures de gloire pendant une dizaine d’années. Mais le recul du temps permet d’affirmer qu’aucune période de l’ellingtonisme ne fut aussi riche et féconde que celle qui va du 6 mars 1940 au 28 juillet 1942, sorte d’apothéose dans l’histoire de la musique afro-américaine.

 

Sucreries, pièces légères et tête-à-tête

De tout temps, les puristes – français en particulier – eurent une fâcheuse tendance à oublier que pour maintenir en activité un orchestre comme celui de Duke Ellington, il était indispensable de faire des concessions au grand public. Jouer pour les seuls aficionados ne pouvait suffire. A côté de ses créations impérissables, le Duke Ellington Orchestra fut souvent conduit à reprendre des airs populaires ou à la mode, fréquemment assortis de parties vocales. Nombre d’enregistrements live effectués au cours des années 1940 permettent de comprendre très exactement en quoi consistait une prestation ordinaire du Duke Ellington Orchestra. Chansons légères faisant défiler divers vocalistes d’un goût parfois discutable y alternaient avec les fleurons instrumentaux du répertoire ellingtonien. Si nous vibrons encore sans retenue à l’écoute de Ko-Ko ou de Cotton Tail, il se trouvait alors un public nombreux pour se pâmer aux barytonades sirupeuses d’un Herb Jeffries. Sucreries ou pièces d’un abord facile coexistent avec le nec plus ultra de la création ellingtonienne.

Au nombre des pièces disons mineures, nous pourrions citer : You, You Darlin’; So Far, So Good ; At A Dixie Roadside Diner ; My Greatest Mistake ; There Shall Be No Night ; Five O’Clock Whistle ; I Never Felt This Way Before ; The Girl In My Dreams Tries To Look Like You ; What Good Would It Do? Nullement déplaisants, ces titres à caractère commercial échappent à l’insignifiance grâce à la couleur des arrangements ainsi qu’aux interventions des solistes. Mais leur matériel thématique est bien trop ordinaire pour que l’on s’y attarde plus longuement. Les structures sollicitées sont toujours celles de la chanson populaire.

En revanche, Me and You, composition maison confiée à la voix d’Ivie Anderson, probablement la meilleure chanteuse qu’ait vu passer la formation, rehausse le niveau d’ensemble de ce corpus. Plutôt enjouée, cette chanson, réutilisant partiellement la grille du standard Just Friends (1931), connaîtra une seconde jeunesse en 1956 lors d’une séance d’enregistrement avec la chanteuse Rosemary Clooney.

Nous devons au sieur William Thomas Strayhorn ce bijou d’orchestration qu’est Flamingo. De l’avis d’Ellington en personne, cet enregistrement marqua une renaissance dans le domaine de l’arrangement pour grand orchestre. Flamingo capta aussitôt l’attention d’autres oreilles pareillement affûtées, celles d’un John Lewis ou d’un Gerry Mulligan en particulier ; Lewis allant jusqu’à déclarer que l’orchestration de Strayhorn sonnait comme si Stravinsky était devenu un musicien de jazz. Herb Jeffries, ex singin’ cowboy, fut chargé de barytonner sur ce titre, « à la Bing Crosby » pourrait-on dire.

Extrait de la production théâtrale Jump For Joy, The Brown-Skin Gal (In The Calico Gown) avait été conçu pour la chanteuse-danseuse Dorothy Dandridge, qui faisait partie de la distribution et fera par la suite carrière à Hollywood (Carmen Jones d’Otto Preminger). Très jolie femme dont la complexion correspondait à celle dont il est question dans la chanson. La coda de The Brown-Skin Gal, jouée par la section des anches après la courte intervention de Harry Carney au baryton, n’est rien de moins que délicieuse.

My Little Brown Book, (trop) sévèrement jugé par Mark Tucker, souffre peut-être ici d’un vocal passablement sentimental (Herb Jeffries) et d’une partie de trombone (Lawrence Brown) un peu trop languide. Mais il suffira que ce titre soit repris vingt ans plus tard par Duke Ellington et John Coltrane pour que sa mélodie apparaisse alors dans tout son éclat.

Reste une poignée de pièces instrumentales d’un standing inférieur à celui des œuvres du premier rayon. D’allure tizolienne, The Flaming Sword pourrait être jugé plutôt routinier dans la mesure où Ellington y a réutilisé la structure harmonique de Stompy Jones (1933) - quelque peu démodée en 1941 ? En outre, ce matériau un tant soit peu anachronique employé ici avec une certaine lourdeur ne semble pas avoir inspiré outre-mesure ses interprètes.

Bakiff et Moon Over Cuba prolongent la veine tropicale introduite dans l’orchestre par Juan Tizol dès le milieu des années 1930. D’aucuns pourraient estimer que Bakiff mérite mieux qu’un simple strapontin. De fait, ce titre demeurera au répertoire de la formation jusque dans les années 1950. Moon Over Cuba n’a pas laissé un souvenir impérissable. Cette pièce vaut pourtant mieux que son manque de réputation. Le passage très chaloupé exécuté par un ensemble de clarinettes tout comme le solo de Ben Webster sont assez délectables. Exotisme à bon marché, estimeront néanmoins certains.

Trois titres, enfin, constituent l’une des contributions du Duke Ellington Orchestra à l’effort de guerre : Hayfoot Strawfoot ; A Slip Of The Lip ; Sherman Shuffle. De l’entraînement des conscrits venus des campagnes (Ivie Anderson aux commandes) jusqu’à la célébration des blindés (le char Sherman) en passant par les recommandations de prudence à la population (les murs ont des oreilles, susurre Ray Nance). Alliance circonstancielle du jazz et du patriotisme, trois pièces sympathiques qui ne manquent pas d’allant mais dont il serait vain de vouloir exagérer l’importance musicale.

La découverte de Jimmy Blanton à l’automne 1939 avait donné lieu à deux pièces enregistrées réunissant le contrebassiste et Duke Ellington au piano. Rebelote en 1940. La pulsation de Blanton fournissait déjà une assise exceptionnellement souple et swingante à l’orchestre. Les quatre titres gravés en duo permettent de prendre la pleine mesure de ses talents d’improvisateur. Jamais auparavant dans l’histoire du jazz un bassiste n’avait fait preuve d’une telle éloquence sur l’instrument. De fait, Ellington pianiste se met tout entier au service de son jeune virtuose. Que ce soit à l’archet (Body And Soul, Sophisticated Lady) – certains commentateurs lui préfèrent parfois un Slam Stewart dans cet exercice – ou, surtout, en pizzicato (Pitter Panther Patter, Mr. J.B. Blues), Blanton éclabousse ces quelques interprétations duelles de toute sa créativité, servie par une maîtrise technique qui, aujourd’hui encore, en remontrerait sans problème à nombre de praticiens du gros violon. Le plus bel hommage rendu au génie de Mr. J.B. est sans doute venu du gratin de la profession. S’adressant au grand Red Mitchell, Oscar Pettiford et Charlie Mingus (pas moins) lui avaient pareillement donné ce conseil : « N’accepte jamais de boulot dans un orchestre où a joué Jimmy Blanton. »

 

En petits comités

En 1936, Helen Oakley Dance (épouse de Stanley Dance, ami proche du Duke) eut l’heureuse idée de produire des séances d’enregistrement dans un environnement encore plus décontracté que celui du big band au sein duquel ne régnait pourtant pas une discipline de fer. Ainsi naquirent les Small Ellington Units, petits ensembles ellingtoniens qui rassemblaient divers membres de l’orchestre. Les arrière-pensées commerciales n’étaient pas étrangères à cette entreprise. Le succès remporté par le trio de Benny Goodman en marge de son orchestre avait en effet donné des idées à la plupart des grandes formations de la Swing Era qui reprirent bientôt à leur compte cette formule gagnante. Johnny Hodges, Cootie Williams, Rex Stewart ou Barney Bigard prirent la tête de ces différents combos. Outre leur évident intérêt jazzistique, la prise en charge de ces petites formations représentait un surcroît de travail pour le Duke qui fut soulagé de pouvoir en confier l’organisation à son futur bras droit, Billy Strayhorn.

Sans entrer dans le détail, relevons d’abord que le répertoire emprunte pour l’essentiel au fonds de la chanson populaire américaine à quoi s’ajoutent blues ou thèmes très simples apportés par l’un ou l’autre musicien du Duke Ellington Orchestra. S’il n’est guère nécessaire de s’attarder sur la forme de ces pièces, leur simplicité permet de goûter un peu plus la singularité de ces fortes individualités dont le Duke avait su s’entourer. Si Johnny Hodges s’illustre dans le registre sophistiqué de la ballade strayhornienne (Day Dream, Passion Flower), il ne brille pas moins sur le terrain du blues qui convient tout autant à son complice Cootie Williams (That’s The Blues, Old Man). Things Ain’t What They Used To Be, dont on découvre ici la version princeps, permet une fois encore d’apprécier le feeling énorme dont Hodges était capable lorsqu’il jouait le blues, épaulé par un Duke très inspiré au piano. Rex Stewart, au cornet, ne se montre pas moins convaincant quand il s’agit de faire vibrer la note bleue (Mobile Bay, Poor Bubber), déployant alors tout un éventail d’effets sonores dont on trouverait difficilement l’équivalent chez quelque souffleur que ce soit dans le jazz. Rex Stewart ne parle pas moins que Joe Nanton au moyen de son instrument et parvient à rendre son cuivre étonnamment loquace (Subtle Slough, devenu plus tard Just Squeeze Me). Expressivité et chaleur du discours caractérisent mêmement les différentes improvisations de Johnny Hodges, Cootie Williams ou Rex Stewart sur ces enregistrements. Barney Bigard, quant à lui, rayonne dans un registre où légèreté et liquidité vont main dans la main (‘C’ Blues esquisse le célèbre C Jam Blues), partageant avec Rex, par exemple, un sens des climats sonores que l’on qualifiera d’authentiquement ellingtonien, quand bien même le Duke y a-t-il apporté le seul concours de son clavier. Lament For Javanette + Menelik (The Lion Of Judah) = Le Livre du jazz de la jungle. Ou comment chercher à dépasser l’ombre immense du Duke sans jamais vouloir s’en affranchir.

In fine, persiste une énigme : comment se fait-il qu’en dehors du giron ducal, ces formidables jazzmen ne se montrèrent jamais aussi inspirés qu’auprès d’Ellington ?

 

Alain PAILLER

 

 

© Frémeaux & Associés 2024

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Suggestions de lectures

- Ellington, Duke, Music Is My Mistress (Da Capo Press, 1973). Traduction française parue aux éditions Slatkine (2016) sous le même titre.

- Gottlieb, William P., The Golden Age of Jazz (Da Capo Press, 1985)

- Hodeir, André, Hommes et Problèmes du Jazz (Parenthèses/Epistrophy, 1981)

- Leur, Walter van de, Something To Live For : The Music of Billy Strayhorn (Oxford University Press, 2002)

- Massagli, Luciano & Volonté, Giovanni M., The New Duke Ellington Story On Records Part One & Two (2 volumes, Milano, 1999)

- Rattenbury, Ken, Duke Ellington, Jazz Composer (Yale University Press, 1990)

- Schuller, Gunther, The Swing Era : The Development of Jazz, 1930-1945 (Oxford University Press, 1989)

- Tucker, Mark, The Duke Ellington Reader (Oxford University Press, 1993)

 

 

 

 

A propos des enregistrements
78-tours d’origine :

 

Alors que l’impact durable des séances ellingtoniennes du début des années 1940 est généralement considéré comme le résultat de l’étonnante symbiose entre Duke, ses musiciens et le pianiste-arrangeur Billy Strayhorn, on n’a guère accordé d’attention aux évolutions de la technologie dans les studios d’enregistrement à cette époque-là.

Avec l’arrivée du microphone à ruban dès 1931, entre autres, les enregistrements RCA Victor gagnèrent de manière significative en clarté comme en précision. Néanmoins, en raison des effets de la Dépression sur l’économie, peu d’Américains disposaient alors d’un équipement susceptible de faire entendre des différences notables. Ainsi, au cours des années suivantes, Victor préféra tenir en réserve ces améliorations sonores afin de coller aux réalités du marché. Par bonheur, ces restrictions semblent avoir été levées vers 1938, et les disques d’Ellington gravés à Chicago en 1940 bénéficient pleinement des progrès accomplis en termes de subtilité ou de détail.

Il en va autrement s’agissant des séances hollywoodiennes plus tardives au cours de la même année. Depuis les années 1920, RCA (= Radio Corporation of America) s’était positionné(e) comme un acteur majeur dans le développement conjoint de la radiophonie et de la technologie du parlant à l’écran. Les historiens du Septième Art reviennent sans cesse sur les prises de vue spectaculaires (plongées) dans les films de Busby Berkeley ou sur la profondeur de champ dans le Citizen Kane d’Orson Welles mais en réalité, d’un strict point de vue technique, la plus grande réussite des studios à la fin des années 1930 fut de proposer des dialogues constamment intelligibles quel qu’ait été le contexte : champs de bataille, orages magnétiques, musiques de fond, émeutes urbaines ou troupeaux de bisons. Ces buts furent atteints grâce au procédé dit de « compression audio » qui a pour effet de rehausser les signaux les plus neutres et d’atténuer les plus dominants.

Sans surprise, lorsque Ellington et ses hommes entrèrent dans les studios d’enregistrement RCA Victor à Hollywood, le 4 mai 1940, les ingénieurs le plus en pointe utilisaient déjà des compresseurs pour chaque micro. L’intention première était de se protéger contre les saturations mais, d’un point de vue musical, cela eut pour effet d’introduire une sorte de tension retenue et d’excitation que l’on ressent aujourd’hui encore à l’écoute de titres comme Cotton Tail,Take The ‘A’ Train ou Johnny Come Lately. De fait, sans le vouloir, les studios RCA de la Côte Ouest avaient inventé le disque pop tel que nous le connaissons…

Lorsqu’en 1950, aux Etats-Unis, fut publié le catalogue RCA Victor de l’année, la plus grande partie des classiques ellingtoniens cuvée 1940-1942 parus en 78-tours n’y figurait déjà plus. Bien que bon nombre de titres majeurs furent en fin de compte réédités sous forme de divers albums au cours des décennies suivantes, ceux-ci durent pourtant subir fréquemment maints caprices liés aux engouements techniques alors en vogue : ajout de réverbération, pseudo-stéréo, élimination radicale de tout bruit parasite, etc. Ceci dans le but passablement discutable de rendre les sources sonores censément « accessibles » à des auditeurs modernes.

Concernant le coffret entre vos mains, j’ai utilisé divers exemplaires des pressages 78-tours que j’ai pu trouver. Néanmoins, j’ai eu recours au strict minimum de correction, qu’il s’agisse de filtrage ou de traitement digital en matière de transfert, ceci au prix, fort modeste, d’un infime bruit de surface ou, occasionnellement, d’une très légère distorsion. Autant que possible, priorité a été accordée à la dynamique la plus large qui soit, à la force d’impact et à l’excitation engendrée par l’orchestre. 82 pistes sur les 94 ici présentées proviennent directement de sources 78-tours, pressages d’origine, tandis que 12 autres ont été restaurées à partir de sources analogiques postérieures.

Tony BALDWIN

© Frémeaux & Associés 2024

 

 

 

 

DUKE AT HIS VERY BEST

The Jimmy Blanton-Billy Strayhorn-Ben Webster Sessions

Legendary Works 1940-1942

It’s Glory

In memory of Alain Tercinet

Throughout the 1930s Duke Ellington continued to develop a highly individualistic approach to orchestration, gathering both inspiration and source material from the musical idiosyncrasies of his various sidemen. This unorthodox method succeeded precisely because, as an arranger, Duke was self-taught, a vital factor behind his major 1940-1942 accomplishments. These came after a fruitful decade of teamwork with key solo stalwarts such as Nanton, Carney, Bigard, Hodges and Williams — the collective backbone of the orchestra. However, if anyone was to put their personal stamp on the band from 1939 onwards, it would be its newest recruits — pianist/arranger Billy Strayhorn, double-bassist Jimmy Blanton and tenor-saxophonist Ben Webster. Certainly, the stability of the band roster and the leader’s own maturity were significant ingredients, but what crucially allowed the Duke Ellington Orchestra to reach its new creative plateau was the arrival of those three musical colossi.

Billy Strayhorn (b.1915, Dayton, Ohio) was a classically-trained musician whose initial contributions to the band were limited to a bit of part-writing and the occasional full arrangement, before he eventually started submitting his own compositions. Duke and Billy both thought in essentially orchestral terms and would routinely orchestrate their respective pieces as they composed them. Strayhorn notated directly on to the page, whereas Ellington did his composing at the keyboard. Although Strayhorn was originally hired to relieve some of Ellington’s varied workload, his presence at Duke’s side gave the leader a much closer relationship with his musicians when it came to fine-tuning arrangements and tweaking performance. The upshot was that no other band of the period could match the inspired two-headed stewardship of the 1940-42 Ellington orchestra.

In September 1939 Duke Ellington happened to see double-bass prodigy Jimmy Blanton playing at a club in St. Louis, Mo.  Blanton’s rich, ringing tone and pioneering blend of walking pizzicato lines and solid swing were impressive enough for Duke to hire him on the spot. In July 1942 Blanton would succumb to tuberculosis in a California sanatorium, aged only 23.

Prior to WWII the tenor-saxophone had been largely dominated by the muscular playing of Coleman Hawkins and his various disciples. One of the more remarkable of these was Benjamin Francis Webster (b.1909, Kansas City, Mo.), aka “The Brute” (for his rather boorish manners) or “Frog” (for his slightly protruding eyeballs). KC in the 1930s was a vibrant mob-controlled hotbed of blues and swing, and Ben had done stints with practically every big name in the business — Bennie Moten, Andy Kirk, Fletcher Henderson, etc. — before joining the Duke.

The broad range of seasoned solo voices in Ellington’s early-1940s sections had a major impact on the American music scene. The slightest individual quirk could be absorbed into the orchestral mix and put to good use, as evidenced by the band’s astonishing output in those fertile years. Despite this profusion of apparently disparate flavours in the Ducal spice-rack, the resulting dishes were always tasty.

 

Key Works

“The greatest concentration of masterpieces in the history of jazz” is how photographer-critic William Gottlieb described Ellington’s 1940 recorded opus. Duke had recently parted ways with his highly efficient but somewhat grasping manager, Irving Mills, and in the process had signed a new recording contract with RCA Victor, whose superior studio quality would do the band more than justice.

Billy Strayhorn claimed to have rewritten Jack The Bear at Duke’s request. Yet the autograph manuscript is in Duke’s own hand and tallies closely with what is on the Victor record, albeit in a slightly different order. With its patchwork structure, the chart bears the leader’s unmistakable stamp from the first to last bar. Section and solo work display admirable dynamism, with honours going to the band’s young bassist, who opens and closes the piece.

Ko-ko is a wild evocation of Congo Square bamboula slave dances in old New Orleans, using appropriate instrumental and rhythmic effects within a 12-bar Eb minor blues structure. It represents the pinnacle of the “jungle” style that had been a Ducal speciality in the mid-1920s. Indeed, Ko-ko is arguably the Ellington masterpiece, weaving its strange magic through seven ensemble choruses of violently contrasting calls and responses in the antiphonal traditions of coastal Africa. Blanton’s walking breaks in the penultimate chorus lead up to an intense final orchestral paroxysm, unprecedented in the history of big-band jazz.

Rex Stewart got the idea for his impressionistic Morning Glory after an all-night poker game on board an ocean liner to France. The appealing melody is arranged as a feature for Rex’s lyrical cornet, swathed in Duke’s lush orchestral figures. This appears to be its only recorded version.

Because of its exotic connotations Conga Brava was coupled with Ko-ko on the original 78 rpm issue. The piece is a joint effort by Ellington and Juan Tizol, whose valve-trombone delivers the eery opening statement, before Webster’s assertive tenor takes over business. Conga Brava is full of sparkling details, from the little brass motifs behind Tizol to Sonny Greer’s lusty quasi-Caribbean tympani.

Concerto for Cootie is played as written from start to finish, without any call for improvisation. Unashamedly tuneful where Ko-Ko is relentlessly raucous, the main theme is based on a repeated phrase that Cootie Williams often used as a warm-up device in rehearsal. The melody later morphed into the hit-song Do Nothin’ Till You Hear From Me. Specialist opinion credits Billy Strayhorn with the 8-bar intro, which seems unrelated to the rest of the piece. Cootie Williams solos masterfully throughout, alternating between plunger and regular mute, before closing on open horn.

Like countless jazz pieces before and since, Cotton Tail is based on the chord sequence of George Gershwin’s I Got Rhythm, but transcends that rather colourless prototype to produce a supercharged rhythmic and melodic feast that literally blows you out of your chair. The intensity of the rhythm section is astonishing. However, the real hero of the piece is Ben Webster, whose bravura tenor solo seems to provide a template for the sax section later on, after forceful comments from Harry Carney’s baritone and Duke’s stride piano.The same session gives us the no less remarkable Never No Lament, a catchy tune attractively played at lithe medium-tempo. It’s a wordless version of Duke’s subsequent vocal hit Don’t Get Around Much Anymore, using a similar chord structure to his 1938 I Let A Song Go Out Of My Heart.

Rather in the manner of Mood Indigo (1930) or Azure (1937), Dusk features a vibrato-less trio of harmonised muted cornet, muted trombone and sub-tone clarinet, each instrument pitched towards the opposite end of its respective “natural” register. The same date produced a couple of musical vignettes that hark back to Duke’s 1939 Weely (about Billy Strayhorn) and Portrait Of The Lion (about Willie ‘The Lion’ Smith). Legendary Harlem hoofer Bill Robinson is the inspiration for the eminently danceable Bojangles, a tune that gives Ben Webster another chance to step into the limelight. A Portrait of Bert Williams celebrates the eponymous ragtime-era vaudeville star who died in 1922, perhaps late enough for young Ellington to have even seen him on stage. Aside from its highly original construction, the piece’s most incisive feature is probably Joe Nanton’s brief trombone solo. Blue Goose wraps up this session with a late opportunity to hear the great Johnny Hodges on soprano saxophone, an instrument that he would soon discard to concentrate on alto. The piece is notable for its somewhat dissonant saxophone tutti and wistful medium-tempo charm.

A skein of thematic motifs runs through the remarkable Harlem Air-Shaft in an atmosphere of heightened tension, but the band’s technical mastery never upstages its rock-solid swing. Ben Webster could also excel at ballads, such as All Too Soon, revealing his consummate skill at balancing machismo with seductiveness. The end-product is both assertive and subtle, underscored by Ellington’s artful pen.

Rumpus In Richmond is a joyous, bouncy up-tempo number in fiesta mood. Cootie Williams gets into the holiday spirit with a scorching series of growl effects. Sepia Panorama started life as an unfinished Billy Strayhorn retread of Erskine Hawkins’ 1939 hit, Tuxedo Junction. It was then picked up by Ellington, who threw out some of Strayhorn’s initial chart and entirely reworked the piece, adding some of his own ingredients. It’s a useful example of Duke’s “collage” technique, which had no equivalent elsewhere in 1940s jazz writing. In A Mellotone provides an illustration of Duke’s approach to orchestral dynamics. As already mentioned, this relied on an antiphonal call-and-response formula borrowed from gospel music.

While on a train trip out to California through rolling hill country, Duke was struck by the landscape’s resem­blance to a recumbent young woman innocently displaying her Warm Valley. Hence this most sensual of ballads, entrusted here to the band’s most sensuous soloist, Johnny Hodges. It was Count Basie’s favourite piece.

While not as sophisticated as something like Ko-Ko, the laid-back charm of Across the Track Blues has much to be said for it. Its ensemble passages and deftly fitting solos conjure up a mood of warmth and relaxation. Duke Ellington’s alter ego Billy Strayhorn wrote the splendid arrangement of Chloë, which includes memorable solos from Joe Nanton and Ben Webster. In Boris Vian’s 1947 novel L’Ecume des jours (Froth On The Daydream) there are several direct references to Ellington, and the hapless heroine with a water lily growing in her lung is even called Chloé.

Originally an 1894 waltz, The Sidewalks Of New York is neither an Ellington nor Strayhorn brainchild, but the sidewalks in question are full of life and laughter, with Joe Nanton’s solo making the most lasting impression. By contrast, Take The ‘A’ Train is definitely a Strayhorn piece and was soon to become the band’s theme tune. However, it nearly didn’t, because the diffident composer had apparently flung his score into the waste basket and Duke’s son Mercer had to fish it out. Taking his cue from one of Duke’s own tricks, Billy recycles the chord chart from Exactly Like You, an old 1930 standard. ‘A’ Train is a hard-swinging showcase for Ray Nance’s dazzling trumpet and proved to be an instant classic. Officially credited to Mercer Ellington, Jumpin’ Punkins offers a rare chance to hear a few solo breaks from drummer Sonny Greer. Granted, Greer wasn’t much of a soloist and even less of a virtuoso, but as a percussion “colourist” he was amazingly intuitive. Swinging is the name of the game throughout John Hardy’s Wife, with some brilliant cornet from Rex Stewart, and the band steaming ahead propelled by Blanton’s implacable four-four.

Blue Serge is harmonically a C minor blues, but in eight-bar form. The brooding tonal textures are among the most fascinating that the orchestra ever produced, and the solo background voicings have an other-worldly feel. After All is a Strayhorn work assigned to Hodges’ gorgeous alto, with luxuriant piano stylings from Billy himself.

In 1936 Ellington decided to unleash Barney Bigard on Clarinet Lament and again here on Are You Sticking? Barneys interplay with the orchestra confirms what’s apparent elsewhere, namely that the unmannered playing of written parts manages to sound like impro. Just  A-Settin’ and A-Rockin’ is custom-made for Webster’s delectable tenor dialogue with the band. Ellington rarely composed anything quite so rapid as The Giddybug Gallop, but Bigard and Nanton are clearly having fun.

Long-time Ellington vocalist Ivie Anderson recaptures the spirit of Duke’s Cotton Club heyday in Chocolate Shake, then segues into the haunting I Got It Bad (And That Ain’t Good). This would become a ballad warhorse for the sublime Johnny Hodges, and a future jazz and songbook standard. Hodges’ alto and Stewart’s Bixian cornet share solo duties on Clementine, another Strayhorn effort.

The title number of Duke’s socially-conscious 1941 L.A. stage show, Jump For Joy is a jokey farewell to southern racial bigotry, as delivered by a wry Ivie Anderson. In the show, Rocks In my Bed was originally a feature for bluesman Joe Turner, but here it’s sung by Ivie. “Jump for Joy” also produced the wacky Bli-Blip, which gives us a sample of Ray Nance’s vocal chops and a final taste of Jimmy Blanton’s fabulous pizzicato. Five O’Clock Drag includes some lively playing on what is basically a simple riff tune.

Billy Strayhorn’s Chelsea Bridge is a purely orchestral score without improvised passages. It remains one of the most graceful compositions in the Ellington book. Billy’s Raincheck was prompted by a damp day on the West Coast, but here Ben Webster couldn’t be more radiant.

Some people might think Ellington too high-flown to handle the blues, but songs like I Don’t Know What Kind Of Blues I Got suggest quite the opposite. Far from watering down the basic concept, he deftly reshapes it into something supple and unpredictable.

Carney’s baritone opens the simplistic Perdido, with Nance taking the trumpet bridge. It was Juan Tizol’s biggest hit after Caravan. Even more artless is the repeated C-to-F hook on C Jam Blues, a tune later rebranded as Duke’s Place when it acquired lyrics. The versatile Ray Nance switches to violin for the atmospheric, slightly melancholy Moon Mist. 

 

In What Am I Here For? Duke’s piano trades fours with Rex Stewart, before Webster’s solo paraphrase and the climactic final band chorus. Melodically, I Don’t Mind might not be as memorable as I Got It Bad, but Ivie’s vocal is just as poignant, and the band is rock-steady. Someone is a little gem which, sadly, time seems to have forgotten, but Hodges, Brown and Nance are very much in evidence.

Main Stem salutes the bustle of Broadway with a pounding D major blues riff and a roll-call of Duke’s main soloists. The strident Johnny Come Lately maintains the lawless mood, with a torrid Lawrence Brown wailing beyond his usual elegant comfort zone.

This outstanding chapter in the Ellington orchestra’s long creative saga closes with the superb instrumental ballad Sentimental Lady, later reworked as the vocal I Didn’t Know About You. In hindsight, one can state unreservedly that the Ellington muse was never quite so fertile as in that rich period from 6th March 1940 to 28th July 1942, marking a kind of apotheosis in the history of African-American music.

 

Adapted by Tony Baldwin
from Alain Pailler’s French notes

 

 

 

© Frémeaux & Associés 2024

 

 

About the original 78 rpm recordings:

While the enduring impact of these early-1940s Ellington sessions is generally acknowledged to be the result of the Duke’s uncanny symbiosis with his own sidemen and pianist-arranger Billy Strayhorn, little attention is ever paid to the role of the period’s changing studio technology.

With, among other things, the introduction of the ribbon microphone in 1931, clarity and precision on RCA-Victor’s recordings were significantly enhanced. However, due to the economic effects of the Depression, few Americans had the kind of replay equipment that would demonstrate any noticeable differences. So for the next few years Victor actually filtered its improved sound to match these market limitations. Mercifully for us, this procedure seems to have been abandoned by 1938, and Ellington’s 1940 Chicago recordings benefit fully from a renewed degree of subtlety and detail.

The orchestra’s sessions in Hollywood later that year are a very different kettle of fish. Since the 1920s, RCA (= Radio Corporation of America) had been a major player in the development of both broadcasting and film-soundtrack technology. Film historians like to dwell on Busby Berkeley’s wondrous crane shots or the depth-of-field in “Citizen Kane”, but in practical terms the industry’s greatest technical triumph of the late-1930s was to make dialogue consistently intelligible, whether above cannon-fire, thunderstorms, background music, rioting mobs or a herd of buffalo. This was achieved through so-called “audio compression”, a process that boosts quieter signals and attenuates louder ones.

Unsurprisingly, when Ellington and his men walked into RCA-Victor’s Hollywood recording studio on May 4th, 1940, the hippest engineers were already using compressors on every microphone. The basic intention was to prevent signal overload, but the musical effect was to introduce a kind of suppressed tension and excitement that’s still palpable on tracks like Cotton Tail, Take The ‘A’ Train and Johnny Come Lately. In essence, RCA’s West Coast studio had inadvertently invented the modern pop record…

By the time the 1950 edition of RCA-Victor’s yearly record catalogue came out, all but a tiny handful of these classic 1940-42 Duke Ellington 78 rpm issues had been unavailable for some years. While many of the key titles eventually found their way on to various reissue albums in subsequent decades, they were often subject to the whims of prevailing technical fashion — added reverb, fake stereo, excessive signal processing, etc. — in a largely misguided attempt to make the material sound more “accessible” to modern ears.

For the present set I have used, where possible, multiple copies of the 78 rpm discs. I have applied a minimum of filtering and digital processing to the transfers, at the modest expense of a little surface noise and slight occasional distortion. The priority has been to convey the dynamic range and musicality of the Ellington orchestra. Some 82 of the 94 tracks in the present set are direct transfers from 78 rpm masters, while 12 others are taken from secondary analogue sources. Tony Baldwin

© Frémeaux & Associés 2024

 

 

 

CD1

1. Jack The Bear (Ellington). DUKE ELLINGTON AND HIS FAMOUS ORCHESTRA. Cootie Williams, Wallace Jones (tp), Rex Stewart (cnt), Joe ‘Tricky Sam’ Nanton, Lawrence Brown (tb), Juan Tizol (vtb), Harry Carney (bs, as, cl), Barney Bigard (cl, ts), Otto Hardwick (as, bsx), Johnny Hodges (as, ss), Ben Webster (ts), Duke Ellington (p, dir.), Fred Guy (g), Jimmy Blanton (sb), Sonny Greer (dms). Chicago, 6 mars 1940. VICTOR 26536. Solistes : Blanton, Ellington, Bigard, Williams, Carney, Nanton. 03:16

 2. Ko-Ko (Ellington). Même formation que pour Jack The Bear. Chicago, 6 mars 1940. VICTOR 26577. Solistes : Tizol, Nanton, Ellington, Blanton. 02:41

 3. Morning Glory (Ellington). Même formation que pour Jack The Bear. Chicago, 6 mars 1940. VICTOR 26536. Soliste : Stewart. 03:16

 4. Conga Brava (Ellington-Tizol). Même formation que pour Jack The Bear. Chicago, 15 mars 1940. VICTOR 26577. Solistes : Tizol, Bigard, Webster, Stewart. 02:57

 5. Concerto For Cootie (Ellington). Même formation que pour Jack The Bear. Chicago, 15 mars 1940. VICTOR 26598. Soliste : Williams. 03:19

 6. Cotton Tail (Ellington). Même formation que pour Jack The Bear. Hollywood, 4 mai 1940. VICTOR 26610. Solistes : Williams, Webster, Carney, Ellington. 03:10

 7. Never No Lament (Ellington). Même formation que pour Jack The Bear. Hollywood, 4 mai 1940. VICTOR 26610. Solistes : Ellington, Brown, Hodges, Williams. 03:18

 8. Dusk (Ellington). Même formation que pour Jack The Bear. Chicago, 28 mai 1940. VICTOR 26677. Solistes : Ellington, Stewart, Brown. 03:17

 9. Bojangles (A Portrait Of Bill Robinson) (Ellington). Même formation que pour Jack The Bear. Chicago, 28 mai 1940. VICTOR 26644. Solistes : Ellington, Blanton, Webster, Bigard. 02:52

10. A Portrait Of Bert Williams (Ellington). Même formation que pour Jack The Bear. Chicago, 28 mai 1940. VICTOR 26644. Solistes : Stewart, Bigard, Nanton. 03:09

11. Blue Goose (Ellington). Même formation que pour Jack The Bear. Chicago, 28 mai 1940. VICTOR 26677. Solistes : Ellington, Hodges, Carney, Williams, Webster, Brown. 03:21

12. Harlem Air-Shaft (Ellington). Même formation que pour Jack The Bear. New York, 22 juillet 1940. VICTOR 26731. Solistes : Nanton, Williams, Bigard. 02:58

13. All Too Soon (Ellington). Même formation que pour Jack The Bear. New York, 22 juillet 1940. VICTOR 27247. Solistes : Ellington, Brown, Webster. 03:30

14. Rumpus In Richmond (Ellington). Même formation que pour Jack The Bear. New York, 22 juillet 1940. VICTOR 26788. Solistes : Williams, Brown, Bigard. 02:46

15. Sepia Panorama (Ellington). Même formation que pour Jack The Bear. New York, 24 juillet 1940. VICTOR 26731. Solistes : Blanton, Tizol, Williams, Carney, Webster. 03:22

16. In A Mellotone (Ellington). Même formation que pour Jack The Bear. Chicago, 5 septembre 1940. VICTOR 26788. Solistes : Ellington, Blanton, Williams, Hodges. 03:17

17. Warm Valley (Ellington). Même formation que pour Jack The Bear. Chicago, 17 octobre 1940. VICTOR 26796. Solistes : Ellington, Hodges, Stewart. 03:22

18. Across The Track Blues (Ellington). Même formation que pour Jack The Bear. Chicago, 28 octobre 1940. VICTOR 27235. Solistes : Ellington, Bigard, Stewart,
Brown. 02:59

19. Chloë (Song Of The Swamp) (Kahn-Moret). Même formation que pour Jack The Bear. Chicago, 28 octobre 1940. VICTOR 27235. Solistes : Nanton, Bigard, Brown, Blanton, Williams, Webster. 03:25

20. The Sidewalks Of New York (Lawlor-Blake). Même formation que pour Jack The Bear. Chicago, 28 décembre 1940. VICTOR 27380. Solistes : Bigard, Nanton, Webster, Carney. 03:15

21. Take The ‘A’ Train (Strayhorn). Même formation que pour Jack The Bear mais Ray Nance (tp, vcl, vln) remplace C. Williams. Hollywood, 15 février 1941. VICTOR 27380. Solistes : Ellington, Nance. 02:55

22. Blue Serge (M. Ellington). Même formation que pour Take The ‘A’ Train. Hollywood, 15 février 1941. VICTOR 27356. Solistes : Stewart, Nanton, Ellington, Webster. 03:21

23. Jumpin’ Punkins (M. Ellington). Même formation que pour Take The ‘A’ Train. Hollywood, 15 février 1941. VICTOR 27356. Solistes : Ellington, Bigard, Carney, Greer. 03:33

 

 

CD2

1. John Hardy’s Wife (M. Ellington). Même formation que pour Take The ‘A’ Train. Hollywood, 15 février 1941. VICTOR 27434. Solistes : Ellington, Carney, Stewart, Brown. 03:30

2. After All (Strayhorn). Même formation que pour Take The ‘A’ Train mais Billy Strayhorn (p) remplace D. Ellington. Hollywood, 15 février 1941. VICTOR 27434. Solistes : Brown, Hodges. 03:20

 3. Are You Sticking? (Ellington). Même formation que pour Take The ‘A’ Train. Hollywood, 5 juin 1941. VICTOR 27804. Soliste : Bigard. 03:01

 4. Just A-Settin’ and A-Rockin’ (Ellington-Strayhorn). Même formation que pour Take The ‘A’ Train. Hollywood, 5 juin 1941. VICTOR 27587. Solistes : Ellington, Blanton, Webster, Nance, Bigard, Nanton. 03:34

 5. The Giddybug Gallop (Ellington). Même formation que pour Take The ‘A’ Train. Hollywood, 5 juin 1941. VICTOR 27502. Solistes : Nanton, Hodges, Bigard. 03:31

 6. Chocolate Shake (Ellington-Webster). Même formation que pour Take The ‘A’ Train + I. Anderson (vcl). Hollywood, 26 juin 1941. VICTOR 27531. Solistes : Greer, Ellington, Carney, Nance, Anderson. 02:53

 7. I Got It Bad (And That Ain’t Good) (Ellington-Strayhorn-Webster). Même formation que pour Take The ‘A’ Train + I. Anderson (vcl). Hollywood, 26 juin 1941. VICTOR 27531. Solistes : Ellington, Hodges, Anderson. 03:18

 8. Clementine (Strayhorn). Même formation que pour Take The ‘A’ Train. Hollywood, 2 juillet 1941. VICTOR 27700. Solistes : Ellington, Hodges, Stewart. 02:58

 9. Jump For Joy (Ellington-Webster-Kuller). Même formation que pour Take The ‘A’ Train + I. Anderson (vcl). Hollywood, 2 juillet 1941. VICTOR LPM-6704 (LP). Solistes : Nanton, Anderson, Hodges. 02:54

10. Five O’Clock Drag (Ellington). Même formation que pour Take The ‘A’ Train. Hollywood, 26 septembre 1941. VICTOR 27700. Solistes : Webster, Stewart. 03:12

11. Rocks In My Bed (Ellington-Strayhorn). Même formation que pour After All. Hollywood, 26 septembre 1941. VICTOR 27639. Solistes : Hodges, Bigard, Anderson. 03:05

12. Bli-Blip (Ellington-Kuller). Même formation que pour Take the ‘A’ Train. Hollywood, 26 septembre 1941. VICTOR 27639. Solistes : Nance, Webster, Blanton. 03:03

13. Chelsea Bridge (Strayhorn). Même formation que pour After All mais Junior Raglin (sb) remplace J. Blanton. Hollywood, 2 décembre 1941. VICTOR 27740. Solistes : Strayhorn, Webster, Tizol. 02:53

14. Raincheck (Strayhorn). Même formation que pour Chelsea Bridge. Hollywood, 2 décembre 1941. VICTOR 27880. Solistes : Tizol, Webster, Strayhorn, Nance. 02:27

15. I Don’t Know What Kind Of Blues I Got (Ellington). Même formation que pour Chelsea Bridge mais D. Ellington (p) remplace B. Strayhorn + H. Jeffries (vcl). Hollywood, 2 décembre 1941. VICTOR 27804. Solistes : Ellington, Bigard, Brown, Webster, Carney, Jeffries. 03:14

16 Perdido (Tizol). Même formation que pour Chelsea Bridge mais D. Ellington (p) remplace B. Strayhorn. Chicago, 21 janvier 1942. VICTOR 27880. Solistes : Ellington, Carney, Nance, Stewart, Webster. 03:09

17. C Jam Blues (Ellington-Strayhorn). Même formation que pour Perdido. Chicago, 21 janvier 1942. VICTOR 27856. Solistes : Ellington, Nance, Stewart, Webster, Nanton, Bigard. 02:39

18. Moon Mist (M. Ellington). Même formation que pour Perdido. Chicago, 21 janvier 1942. VICTOR 27856. Solistes : Ellington, Nance, Hodges, Brown. 02:58

19. What Am I Here For? (Ellington). Même formation que pour Perdido. New York, 26 février 1942. VICTOR 20-1598. Solistes : Nanton, Ellington, Stewart, Webster. 03:25

20. I Don’t Mind (Strayhorn-Ellington). Même formation que pour Perdido + I. Anderson (vcl). New York, 26 février 1942. VICTOR 20-1598. Solistes : Ellington, Anderson, Nance, Carney, Brown. 02:49

21. Someone (Ellington). Même formation que pour Perdido. New York, 26 février 1942. VICTOR 20-1584. Solistes : Hodges, Brown, Nance. 03:09

22. Main Stem (Ellington). Même formation que pour Perdido. Hollywood, 26 juin 1942. VICTOR 20-1556. Solistes : Stewart, Hodges, Nance, Bigard, Nanton, Webster, Brown. 02:48

23. Johnny Come Lately (Strayhorn). Même formation que pour Perdido mais B. Strayhorn (p) remplace D. Ellington. Hollywood, 26 juin 1942. VICTOR 20-1556. Solistes : Strayhorn, Brown, Nanton. 02:39

24. Sentimental Lady (Ellington). Même formation que pour Perdido + C. Haughton (cl) remplace B. Bigard. Chicago, 28 juillet 1942. VICTOR 20-1528. Solistes : Ellington, Hodges, Stewart. 03:02

 

 

CD3

1. You, You Darlin’ (Scholl-Jerome). Même formation que pour Jack The Bear + H. Jeffries (vcl). Chicago, 6 mars 1940. VICTOR 26537. Solistes : Ellington, Webster, Jeffries, Brown. 03:20

2. So Far, So Good (Lawrence-Mundy-White). Même formation que sur Jack The Bear + I. Anderson (vcl). Chicago, 6 mars 1940. VICTOR 26537. Solistes : Ellington, Anderson, Carney. 02:53

 3. Me and You (Ellington). Même formation que pour Jack The Bear + I. Anderson (vcl). Chicago, 15 mars 1940. VICTOR 26598. Solistes : Williams, Hodges, Anderson, Brown, Bigard. 02:54

 4. At A Dixie Roadside Diner (Leslie-Burke). Même formation que pour Jack The Bear + I. Anderson (vcl). New York, 22 juillet 1940. VICTOR 26719. Solistes : Ellington, Stewart, Bigard, Anderson, Carney. 02:48

 5. My Greatest Mistake (Fulton-O’Brien). Même formation que pour Jack The Bear. New York, 24 juillet 1940. VICTOR 26719. Solistes : Carney, Webster, Brown. 03:25

 6. There Shall Be No Night (Shelley-Silver). Même formation que pour Jack The Bear + H. Jeffries (vcl). Chicago, 5 septembre 1940. VICTOR 26748. Solistes : Ellington, Jones, Webster, Jeffries. 03:10

 7. Five O’Clock Whistle (Gannon-Myrow-Irwin). Même formation que pour Jack The Bear + I. Anderson. Chicago, 5 septembre 1940. VICTOR 26748. Solistes : Stewart, Carney, Hodges, Anderson. 03:18

 8. The Flaming Sword (Ellington). Même formation que pour Jack The Bear. Chicago, 17 octobre 1940. VICTOR 26796. Solistes : Williams, Bigard, Tizol, Nanton. 03:06

 9. I Never Felt This Way Before (Ellington-Dubin). Même formation que pour Jack The Bear + H. Jeffries (vcl). Chicago, 28 octobre 1940. VICTOR 27247. Solistes : Ellington, Webster, Tizol, Jones, Williams, Jeffries, Brown. 03:29

10 Flamingo (Grouya-Anderson). Même formation que pour Jack The Bear + H. Jeffries (vcl) et B. Strayhorn (p) remplace D. Ellington. Chicago, 28 décembre 1940. VICTOR 27326. Solistes : Jeffries, Strayhorn, Brown, Hodges. 03:24

11. The Girl In My Dreams (Tries To Look Like You) (M. Ellington). Même formation que pour Jack The Bear + H. Jeffries (vcl). Chicago, 28 décembre 1940. VICTOR 27326. Solistes : Webster, Jeffries, Stewart. 03:18

12. Bakiff (Tizol). Même formation que pour Take The ‘A’ Train. Hollywood, 5 juin 1941. VICTOR 27502. Solistes : Tizol, Nance. 03:23

13. The Brown-Skin Gal (In The Calico Gown) (Ellington-Webster). Même formation que pour Take The ‘A’ Train + H. Jeffries (vcl). Hollywood, 2 juillet 1941. VICTOR 27517. Solistes : Jeffries, Carney. 03:08

14. Moon Over Cuba (Ellington-Tizol). Même formation que pour Take The ‘A’ Train. Hollywood, 2 juillet 1941. VICTOR 27587. Solistes : Tizol, Hodges, Webster. 03:10

15. What Good Would It Do? (Pepper-James). Même formation que pour Chelsea Bridge mais sans B. Strayhorn (p) + H. Jeffries (vcl). Hollywood, 2 décembre 1941. VICTOR 27740. Soliste : Jeffries. 02:45

16. My Little Brown Book (Strayhorn). Même formation que pour Chelsea Bridge + H. Jeffries (vcl). Hollywood, 26 juin 1942. VICTOR 20-1584. Solistes : Brown, Jeffries, Webster. 03:12

17. Hayfoot Strawfoot (Lenk-Drake-McGrane). Même formation que pour I Don’t Mind + I. Anderson (vcl) et C. Haughton (cl) remplace B. Bigard. Chicago, 28 juillet 1942. VICTOR 20-1505. Solistes : Stewart, Ellington, Anderson, Webster. 02:33

18. A Slip Of The Lip (Can Sink A Ship) (M. Ellington-Henderson). Même formation que pour Hayfoot Strawfoot. Chicago, 28 juillet 1942. VICTOR 20-1528. Solistes : Nance, Hodges. 02:53

19. Sherman Shuffle (Ellington). Même formation que pour Hayfoot Strawfoot. Chicago, 28 juillet 1942. VICTOR 20-1505. Solistes : Ellington, Brown, Haughton, Nance, Stewart. 02:38

20. Pitter Panther Patter (Ellington). Duke Ellington (p), Jimmy Blanton (sb). Chicago, 1 octobre 1940. VICTOR 27221. 03:02

21. Body And Soul (Heyman-Sour-Eyton-Green). Duke Ellington (p), Jimmy Blanton (sb). Chicago, 1 octobre 1940. VICTOR 27406. 03:10

22. Sophisticated Lady (Ellington-Mills-Parrish). Duke Ellington (p), Jimmy Blanton (sb). Chicago, 1 octobre 1940. VICTOR 27221. 02:44

23. Mr. J.B. Blues (Ellington-Blanton). Duke Ellington (p), Jimmy Blanton (sb). Chicago, 1 octobre 1940. VICTOR 27406. 03:05

 

 

 

CD4

1.
Good Queen Bess
(Hodges). JOHNNY HODGES & HIS ORCHESTRA : Cootie Williams (tp), Lawrence Brown (tb), Johnny Hodges (ss, as), Harry Carney (bs), Duke Ellington (p), Jimmy Blanton (sb), Sonny Greer (dms). Chicago, 2 novembre 1940. BLUEBIRD B- 11117. Solistes : Hodges, Williams, Brown. 03:00

 2. Day Dream (Strayhorn-Ellington-La Touche). Même formation et séance que pour Good Queen Bess. BLUEBIRD B-11021. Soliste : Hodges. 02:55

 3. That’s The Blues, Old Man (Hodges). Même formation et séance que pour Good Queen Bess. BLUEBIRD B-11117. Solistes : Hodges, Williams. 02:55

 4. Junior Hop (Ellington). Même formation et séance que pour Good Queen Bess. BLUEBIRD B-11021. Solistes : Hodges, Ellington, Brown. 03:07

 5. Without A Song (Rose-Eliscu-Youmans). REX STEWART & HIS ORCHESTRA : Rex Stewart (cnt), Lawrence Brown (tb), Ben Webster (ts), Harry Carney (as, bs), Duke Ellington (p), Jimmy Blanton (sb), Sonny Greer (dms). Chicago, 2 novembre 1940. BLUEBIRD B-10946. Solistes :  Stewart, Carney. 02:45

 6. My Sunday Gal (Ellington). Même formation et séance que pour Without A Song. BLUEBIRD B-10946. Solistes : Ellington, Stewart, Carney. 03:09

 7. Mobile Bay (Stewart-Ellington). Même formation et séance que pour Without A Song. BLUEBIRD B-11057. Solistes : Stewart, Webster. 03:06

 8. Linger Awhile (Rose-Owens). Même formation et séance que pour Without A Song. BLUEBIRD B-11057. Solistes : Carney, Stewart, Ellington, Webster, Brown. 03:25

 9. Charlie The Chulo (Ellington). BARNEY BIGARD & HIS ORCHESTRA : Ray Nance (tp), Juan Tizol (vtb), Barney Bigard (cl), Ben Webster (ts), Harry Carney (bs), Duke Ellington (p), Jimmy Blanton (sb), Sonny Greer (dms). Chicago, 11 novembre 1940. BLUEBIRD B-10981. Solistes : Bigard, Webster, Ellington. 03:04

10. Lament for Javanette (Bigard-Strayhorn). Même formation et séance que pour Charlie The Chulo. BLUEBIRD B-11098. Solistes : Bigard, Webster, Tizol. 02:51

11. A Lull At Dawn (Ellington). Même formation et séance que pour Charlie The Chulo. BLUEBIRD B-10981. Solistes : Ellington, Bigard. 03:28

12. Ready Eddy (Bigard). Même formation et séance que pour Charlie The Chulo. BLUEBIRD B-11098. Solistes : Bigard, Ellington. 03:12

13. Some Saturday (Stewart). REX STEWART & HIS ORCHESTRA : Rex Stewart (cnt), Lawrence Brown (tb), Ben Webster (ts), Harry Carney (bs, as), Duke Ellington (p), Jimmy Blanton (sb), Sonny Greer (dms). Hollywood, 3 juillet 1941. BLUEBIRD B-11258. Solistes : Stewart, Carney, Webster, Brown. 02:58

14. Subtle Slough (Ellington). Même formation et séance que pour Some Saturday. BLUEBIRD B-11258. Soliste : Stewart. 03:14

15. Menelik (The Lion Of Judah) (Stewart). Même formation et séance que pour Some Saturday. HIS MASTER’S VOICE JO-282. Soliste : Stewart. 03:18

16. Poor Bubber (Stewart). Même formation et séance que pour Some Saturday. HIS MASTER’S VOICE JO-282. Solistes : Stewart, Webster, Brown. 03:20

17. Squaty Roo (Hodges). JOHNNY HODGES & HIS ORCHESTRA : Ray Nance (tp), Lawrence Brown (tb), Johnny Hodges (as), Harry Carney (bs), Duke Ellington (p), Jimmy Blanton (sb), Sonny Greer (dms). Hollywood, 3 juillet 1941. BLUEBIRD B-11447. Soliste : Hodges. 02:24

18. Passion Flower (Strayhorn). Même formation et séance que pour Squaty Roo. BLUEBIRD 30-0817. Soliste : Hodges. 03:08

19. Things Ain’t What They Used To Be (M. Ellington). Même formation et séance que pour Squaty Roo. BLUEBIRD B-11447. Solistes : Hodges, Ellington, Nance. 03:37

20. Goin’ Out The Back Way (Hodges). Même formation et séance que pour Squaty Roo. BLUEBIRD 30-0817. Solistes : Hodges, Ellington, Carney. 02:42

21. Brown Suede (Ellington). BARNEY BIGARD & HIS ORCHESTRA : Ray Nance (tp), Juan Tizol (vtb), Barney Bigard (cl), Harry Carney (bs), Duke Ellington (p), Jimmy Blanton (sb), Sonny Greer (dms). Hollywood, 29 septembre 1941. BLUEBIRD B-11581. Solistes : Bigard, Ellington. 03:07

22. Noir Bleu (Strayhorn). Même formation et séance que pour Brown Suede. RCA VICTOR 75743. Solistes : Bigard, Ellington. 03:16

23. ‘C’ Blues (Ellington). Même formation et séance que pour Brown Suede. BLUEBIRD B-11581. Solistes : Nance, Bigard, Carney. 02:54

24. June (Bigard). Même formation et séance que pour Brown Suede. HIS MASTER’S VOICE JO-290. Solistes : Bigard, Tizol. 03:16

Where to order Frémeaux products ?

by

Phone

at 01.43.74.90.24

by

Mail

to Frémeaux & Associés, 20rue Robert Giraudineau, 94300 Vincennes, France

in

Bookstore or press house

(Frémeaux & Associés distribution)

at my

record store or Fnac

(distribution : Socadisc)

I am a professional

Bookstore, record store, cultural space, stationery-press, museum shop, media library...

Contact us